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I have a string which is too long, I want to find and locate all of the wanted words. For example I want to find the locations of all "apple"s in the string. Can you tell me how I do that? Thanks

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1  
Look into boost::regex if you need to match more complex stuff. Otherwise, stick with Frerich Raabe's answer. –  Mihai Todor Jul 6 '12 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

Apply repeatedly std::string::find if you are using C++ strings, or std::strstr if you are using C strings; in both cases, at each iteration start to search n characters after the last match, where n is the length of your word.

std::string str="one apple two apples three apples";
std::string search="apple";
for(std::string::size_type pos=0; pos<str.size(); pos+=search.size())
{
    pos=str.find(search, pos);
    if(pos==std::string::npos)
        break;
    std::cout<<"Match found at: "<<pos<<std::endl;
}

(link)

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This won't find the overlapping matches - e.g. for a pattern eye and string eyeye, all the answers given so far will only find the first occurrence. –  Ivan Vergiliev Jul 6 '12 at 13:12
    
I think this will break if the match is at the end of the string, e.g. if str would end in apple. In that case, you would call std::string::find(search, pos); with a value of pos being equal to size(). Not sure that's allowed. –  Frerich Raabe Jul 6 '12 at 13:18
    
@IvanVergiliev: if that's desired or not depends on what specification you want to implement with this function (there are valid use cases for both specifications); still, all it's needed is to change pos+=... to pos++. –  Matteo Italia Jul 6 '12 at 18:55
    
@FrerichRaabe: it's the same thing I thought, but I had to go before I checked the standard. Still, I'll add a quick check, just to be sure. –  Matteo Italia Jul 6 '12 at 18:56

Use a loop which repeatedly calls std::string::find; on each iteration, you start finding beyond your last hit:

std::vector<std::string::size_type> indicesOf( const std::string &s,
                                               const std::string &needle )
{
  std::vector<std::string::size_type> indices;
  std::string::size_type p = 0;
  while ( p < s.size() ) {
    std::string::size_type q = s.find( needle, p );
    if ( q == std::string::npos ) {
      break;
    }
    indices.push_back( q );
    p = q + needle.size(); // change needle.size() to 1 for overlapping matches
  }
  return indices;
}
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void findApples(const char* someString)
{
   const char* loc = NULL;
   while ((loc = strstr(someString, "apple")) != NULL) {
      // do something
      someString = loc + strlen("apple");
   }
}
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Given that the qustion is about C++, I'd consider an answer about std::string to be more appropriate. –  Frerich Raabe Jul 6 '12 at 13:01

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