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I'm trying to use this example to create a program which will list all filenames in a directory in a Windows::Forms::ListBox.

Since the user won't be doing any inputting I won't be needing the void DisplayErrorBox(LPTSTR lpszFunction) function along with other error checking.

When I click the button that triggers the event this is what is shown in the list box.

o //&#o/
/ //
/ //
/ //
/ //
/ //
/ //
/ //

Also, only one row appear each time i click the button. It's supposed to find all the files in the directory and list them not just find the next file each time I click the button.

I also want to use a relative strPath, not absolute... So far this is what I've done with the code:

private:
    void List_Files()
    {
        std::string strPath =   "C:\\Users\\Andre\\Dropbox\\Programmering privat\\Diablo III DPS Calculator\\Debug\\SavedProfiles";     
        TCHAR* Path = (TCHAR*)strPath.c_str();

        WIN32_FIND_DATA ffd;
        LARGE_INTEGER filesize;
        TCHAR szDir[MAX_PATH];
        size_t length_of_arg;
        HANDLE hFind = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;

        // Prepare string for use with FindFile functions.  First, copy the
        // string to a buffer, then append '\*' to the directory name.

        StringCchCopy(szDir, MAX_PATH, Path);
        StringCchCat(szDir, MAX_PATH, TEXT("\\*"));

        // List all the files in the directory with some info about them.

        do
        {
          if (ffd.dwFileAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY)
          {
              //If it's a directory nothing should happen. Just continue with the next file.

          }
          else
          {
                //convert from wide char to narrow char array
                char ch[260];
                char DefChar = ' ';

                WideCharToMultiByte(CP_ACP,0,(ffd.cFileName),-1, ch,260,&DefChar, NULL);

                //A std:string  using the char* constructor.
                std::string str(ch);
                String ^ sysStr = gcnew String(str.c_str());

              MessageBox::Show("File Found", "NOTE");
              ListBoxSavedFiles->Items->Add (sysStr);

          }
        }
        while (FindNextFile(hFind, &ffd) != 0);

        FindClose(hFind);
    }
share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to use so many string types: std::string, System::String, Wide-char strings, char-strings ?? –  Ajay Jul 7 '12 at 6:26
    
So, use .NET framework to retrieve the list! –  Ajay Jul 7 '12 at 11:31
    
@Ajay I need to use System::String beacuse i'm working with System::Windows::Forms and the std::string i need because some functions won't take the System::string. but when it comes to the wide char string and char string and the WideCharToMultiByte function, I googeled that part to convert from ffd.cFileName to a string i could use. so if there's a better way to do it i would gladly try it. –  Tejpbit Jul 7 '12 at 11:31
    
Not sure how to use the .NET framework. i'll google a bit and see if i can find something useful. –  Tejpbit Jul 7 '12 at 11:33
    
Use TCHAR, or use ANSI build. See this article: codeproject.com/Articles/76252/… –  Ajay Jul 7 '12 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

FindFirstFile() is never called, you need to call it before calling FindNextFile():

HANDLE hFind = FindFirstFile(TEXT("C:\\Users\\Andre\\Dropbox\\Programmering privat\\Diablo III DPS Calculator\\Debug\\SavedProfiles\\*"), &ffd);

if (INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE != hFind)
{
    do
    {
        //...

    } while(FindNextFile(hFind, &ffd) != 0);
    FindClose(hFind);
}
else
{
    // Report failure.
}
share|improve this answer

If you do not mind using Boost, you can use a directory_iterator:

using boost::filesystem;

path p("some_dir");
for (directory_iterator it(p); it != directory_iterator(); ++it) {
    cout << it->path() << endl;
}

It works on Windows too and it definitely looks much simpler. Of course, you would need to adapt your current code a little bit, but I think in the long term it is well worth the effort.

share|improve this answer

The cast (TCHAR*)strPath.c_str(); is wrong. From your use of WideCharToMultiByte I know that (TCHAR*)strPath.c_str(); is casting a char const* to a wchar_t*. Not only does that lose a const, but the width is also wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Although you're identifying a problem with the code there, that doesn't help the OP with solving the problem. All the different String types in C++ can be very confusing. –  Simon André Forsberg Jul 9 '12 at 16:48

If u are using Visual Studio then change the configuration settings to Use Multibyte Character set. This will your TCHAR thing to compile without any cast.

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