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I'm trying to make a function that returns the index of the Nth occurrence of a given char in a string.

Here is my attempt:

private int IndexOfNth(string str, char c, int n)
{
    int index = str.IndexOf(c) + 1;
    if (index >= 0)
    {
        string temp = str.Substring(index, str.Length - index);
        for (int j = 1; j < n; j++)
        {
            index = temp.IndexOf(c) + 1;
            if (index < 0)
            {
                return -1;
            }
            temp = temp.Substring(index, temp.Length - index);
        }
        index = index + (str.Length);
    }
    return index;
}

This should find the first occurrence, chop off that front part of the string, find the first occurrence from the new substring, and on and on until it gets the index of the nth occurrence. However I failed to consider how the index of the final substring is going to be offset from the original actual index in the original string. How do I make this work?

Also as a side question, if I want the char to be the tab character do I pass this function '\t' or what?

share|improve this question
    
And yes, you pass it '\t'. –  minitech Jul 6 '12 at 13:32
2  
possible duplicate of Find Nth occurrence of a character in a string –  Eren Ersönmez Jul 6 '12 at 13:35
    
Hmm... I wonder if you can do int f = 0; return str.TakeWhile(x => x != t || ++f < n).Count();? –  minitech Jul 6 '12 at 13:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Using LINQ to find the index of the 5'th a in the string aababaababa:

var str = "aababaababa";
var ch = 'a';
var n = 5;
var result = str
  .Select((c, i) => new { c, i })
  .Where(x => x.c == ch)
  .Skip(n - 1)
  .FirstOrDefault();
return result != null ? result.i : -1;
share|improve this answer
1  
Not as efficient as the solutions that simply loops over the characters in the string. –  Martin Liversage Jul 6 '12 at 13:40
2  
@StickFigs: If there is no first item, .FirstOrDefault() returns null, so you can't get the i property (or is it a field with anonymous types?) and you want -1. –  minitech Jul 6 '12 at 13:54
1  
Why do you need to use ToCharArray to copy the string into a new char[]? String is IEnumerable<char> already. Is it more efficient? –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '12 at 13:56
1  
@StickFigs: I have also upvoted this answer, but it's rather a feasibility study than the best way(imho). To be hoest minitechs or J.Skeets approaches are more efficient and even more readable. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '12 at 14:12
2  
@TimSchmelter: I don't need to use ToCharArray. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Martin Liversage Jul 6 '12 at 15:13

Don't do that; IndexOf takes a second parameter that specifies where to start.

private static int IndexOfNth(string str, char c, int n) {
    int s = -1;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        s = str.IndexOf(c, s + 1);

        if (s == -1) break;
    }

    return s;
}
share|improve this answer

Taking all these substrings seems pretty wasteful to me. Why not just loop yourself?

private int IndexOfNth(string str, char c, int n)
{
    int remaining = n;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (str[i] == c)
        {
            remaining--;
            if (remaining == 0)
            {
                return i;
            }
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

(I considered using IndexOf in a loop like minitech's solution, but decided it was a bit fiddly. Either's fine, of course. Both basically do the same work, only ever checking each character once. Using IndexOf may be slightly more efficient, but go for whichever you find more readable.)

share|improve this answer

I tend to first think about how to access the collection using Linq.

  // 0-based n.
char result = str
  .Where(x => x == c)
  .Skip(n)
  .FirstOrDefault();

Then I'll unpack the linq and add the indexed iteration.

int foundCount = -1;
for(int position = 0; position < str.Length; position++)
{
  char x = str[position];
  if (x == c)
  {
    foundCount += 1;
    // 0-based n
    if (foundCount == n)
    {
      return position;
    }
  }
}
return -1;

Then I think about: what if this method returned all the indexes so I can query them:

public IEnumerable<int> Positions(string str, char c)
{
  for(int position = 0; position < str.Length; position++)
  {
    char x = str[position];
    if (x == c)
    {
      yield return position;
    }
  }
}

Called by:

int position = Positions(str, c)
 .Skip(n) // 0-based n
 .DefaultIfEmpty(-1)
 .First();
share|improve this answer
1  
Oh, this is even better. –  minitech Jul 6 '12 at 14:02
    
+1, but here are some minor fixes in the call: int position = Positions(str, ch).Skip(n-1).DefaultIfEmpty(-1).First(); –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '12 at 14:30
    
@TimSchmelter thanks for the tip on DefaultIfEmpty - I should have checked my overloads. I'm going to stay with 0-based indexing on this Skip. –  David B Jul 6 '12 at 14:46

Instead of creating a bunch of substrings, why not use the IndexOf overload that takes a starting index? This will be both easier (you won't have to adjust the final index) and more efficient (you don't have to allocate a bunch of substrings).

share|improve this answer

Not tested but something like this should work:

private int IndexOfNth(string str, char c, int n)
{
    int index = -1;
    while (n-- > 0)
    {
        index = str.IndexOf(c, index + 1);
        if (index == -1) break;
    }
    return index;
}
share|improve this answer

Hadn't seen anyone use the CharEnumerator yet...

    public Int32 getNthIndex(string str, char c, Int32 n)
    {
        Int32 index = 0;
        Int32 count = 0;
        if (str != null && str.Length > 0 && !(n < 1))
        {
            CharEnumerator scanner = str.GetEnumerator();
            while (scanner.MoveNext())
            {
                if (scanner.Current == c) { count++; }
                if (count == n) { break; }
                index++;
            }
            if (count < n) { index = -1; }
        }
        if (count == 0) { return -1; } else { return index; }
    }

Should be pretty efficient, no substrings or anything, just scan through the string you're given and keep count.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you use a CharEnumerator explicitly when a foreach loop already uses it implicitly? Also, your last paragraph is completely false. –  minitech Jul 7 '12 at 1:59
    
I dissagree about my last paragraph. All of the other solutions will return the index of the n - 1 occurance of c instead of correctly reporting -1 (indicating the nth occurance was not found) as mine does. –  Kevin Jul 9 '12 at 12:53
    
Also, let me turn around your question to me. Why would you prefer the foreach loop abstraction which, in this case, does not buy you anything over directly using the CharEnumerator. I was mearly presenting a viable alternative which is what I thought constructive discourse was all about. –  Kevin Jul 9 '12 at 13:53
    
Obviously you haven't actually tried all the other solutions. I haven't either, but I have tried mine (works) and Jon Skeet's (works), and through a cursory inspection it seems that every answer does that. As for the foreach loop abstraction, I would prefer it because it's shorter and much more obvious. You've managed to make C# look like Java. Also, despite all the checks that shouldn't really be there, your code still manages to return an incorrect result for getNthIndex("a", 'a', 0): 1, as opposed to -1. Fixed all that for you. gist.github.com/3076861 –  minitech Jul 9 '12 at 14:25
    
I appologize and concede that I had not tried the other solutions. Also that I have since tried your solution and it indeed works under the conditions that I had outlined, and that mine returned (incorectly) 1 under the input you defined (I have fixed this in the latest edit). I therefore retract my last paragraph (and have removed it). However, in regards to the "checks that shouldn't be there" try feeding your solution (null, 'a', 1) and see how well it fares. –  Kevin Jul 9 '12 at 14:56

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