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At the moment, I have this:

 do{
           if (i < y){ //y is a constant

               ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
               ObsHandler.search(); 

           }
           else { 
               break;
           }

       } while (!endline.equals(null)); // endline is changed during each loop cycle

With this loop, and the inputs I have, endline can not be null; this renders the while loop breaking condition redundant. When I try and convert this loop to a for loop, I get a misplaced construct error from Eclipse.

i.e:

for (i < y) {
       ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
       ObsHandler.search(); }

Whilst, the while loop I have works, it seems like bad practice to me. Any suggestions? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
99% of for loops are used to go through an array/collection. For other stuff use a while loop. Your code is ok. –  Tudor Jul 6 '12 at 13:39
1  
Do you mean for(;i<y;) ? –  mazaneicha Jul 6 '12 at 13:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you don't need to check endLine, you can still use a while loop:

while (i < y) {    
    ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
    ObsHandler.search(); 
}

If you also need to check endLine:

while (i < y && !endline.equals(null)) {    
    ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
    ObsHandler.search(); 
}

Note: the difference between do / while (your initial code) and while { } is that in the first case the loop is always run at least once. With a while { }, it is not run at all if the condition is not true at the beginning. That is the same behaviour as a for loop (won't run if the condition is false before the loop).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for. I just wasn't sure if a while loop was the correct form. –  user1486147 Jul 6 '12 at 13:49
2  
This loop is indeed the correct form. But I strongly advise changing i and y to something a little more meaningful. –  corsiKa Jul 6 '12 at 13:56
1  
Normally, I'd agree but in the context of the entire project they are meaningful. –  user1486147 Jul 6 '12 at 13:58

If you want to use a for loop, you need to have all three parts of a standard for. Since you have two conditions, they need to be both included in the condition part:

for ( ; i < y && !endline.equals(null); ) {
    ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler();
    ObsHandler.search();
}

You probably have some initialization code for i, like i=0, which could also go into the initialization section of the for loop. Otherwise, if all you have is a set of conditions to check without some array or list you are iterating, while or do is really the better fit.

share|improve this answer
2  
I like the whole statement except that while or do is a better fit. While loops were designed for waiting on a logical condition. For loops were specifically made for the specific logical condition of "I want to run x number of times". The convention can be broken and either used as either, but bottom line if you know exactly how many times to execute, a for loop is superior to a while loop specifically for the reason you outlined, which is that your index variable can be init'd with the for loop, thus limiting its scope. –  corsiKa Jul 6 '12 at 13:43
    
@corsiKa: Good point, thanks for adding your input. It does seem in this case while would be ok simply because the conditions are modified directly as a side-effect in ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(), rather than some index or counter that is incremented throughout the loop. –  mellamokb Jul 6 '12 at 13:45
    
Thanks, I was just seeking reassurance that this use of a while loop would not be frowned upon. –  user1486147 Jul 6 '12 at 13:45
    
@SeanKenny: I would double-check for one-off error, because I'm not sure I've captured the meaning exactly how I've combined the conditions. –  mellamokb Jul 6 '12 at 13:48
2  
@SeanKenny What is frowned upon is using i as a variable that gets changed in multiple methods like that. Not only is it making debugging difficult for that because i is a HORRIBLE variable name for anything other than a simple for loop, but it also will confuse anyone else who tries to use for loop. If they accidentially make their for loop somewhere else in the code go for(i = 0; i <... and for get the int (which happens late in the day/night...) then it's a bug that might go undetected for quite a while. –  corsiKa Jul 6 '12 at 13:56

A while loop seems like the natural choice for your code. I would just simplify it to:

do {
  ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
  ObsHandler.search(); 
} while (i < y && !endline.equals(null)); // endline is changed during each loop cycle

or, if you need to check the conditions before:

while (i < y && !endline.equals(null)) {
  ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
  ObsHandler.search();
}
share|improve this answer
for (boolean start=true;(start || endline != null) && i < y;){
    start=false;
    ObsHandler.obsPartsHandler(); //increment i twice
    ObsHandler.search();
}

(startendline != null) is only tested the second time.
i < y is only tested the first time.

share|improve this answer
2  
What is the purpose of the boolean? –  Colin D Jul 6 '12 at 13:47
    
look at edit... –  neyb Jul 6 '12 at 13:52
    
The question mentions that is not possible for endline to equal null and that the outer loop condition is not longer needed. –  Colin D Jul 6 '12 at 13:57
    
fair enough but I think the original poster was confused about what he was trying to achieve - what you show is equivalent to a do / while but that's not necessarily what he wanted. See the note at the bottom of my answer. –  assylias Jul 6 '12 at 14:07
    
but Colin D is right... –  neyb Jul 6 '12 at 14:07

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