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I would like to know how would you address such a problem:

I have a class Foo:

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo()  {   }
    ~Foo() {   }
    float member1() { return _member1; }
private: 
    float _member1;
    // other members etc...
}

A container class that, among other things, holds a container of pointers to Foo instances

class FooContainer
{
public:
   FooContainer() {   }
   ~FooContainer() {   }
   void addFoo(Foo* f) {_foos.push_back(f);}
private:
   boost::ptr_vector<Foo> _foos;
}

My problem is this: at runtime I am required to "add" new (completely different) members to Foo, depending on the instructions from the GUI. I could address the problem by creating two "decorators" like this:

class Decorator1
{
public:
   int   alpha() { return _alpha; }
   float beta()  { return _beta; }
private:
   int _alpha;
   float _beta;
}

class Decorator2
{
typedef std::complex<float> cmplx;
public:
   cmplx  gamma() { return _gamma; }
   double delta()  { return _delta; }
private:
   cmplx  _gamma;
   double _delta;
}

and then I would create two different Foo implementations:

class Foo1 : public Foo, public Decorator1 
{   }

class Foo2 : public Foo, public Decorator2 
{   }

and use each one according to the GUI command. However such a change would propagate through all my code and would force me to create two different versions for each class that uses Foo1 and Foo2 (e.g. I'd have to create FooContainer1 and FooContainer2).

A less intrusive way of doing this would be to create

class Bar: public Foo, public Decorator1, public Decorator2
{   }

and use this instead of Foo. In this case I'd call only the functions I need from Decorator1 and Decorator2 and ignore the others, but this seems to go against good OOP techniques.

Any suggestions regarding the problem ?

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1  
I have the feeling that your solution is way more complex than the problem to resolve. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 6 '12 at 13:55
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4 Answers

Why don't you use simple polymorphism like this?

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo()  {   }
    virtual ~Foo() {   }
    float member1() { return _member1; }
private: 
    float _member1;
    // other members etc...
}

class Foo1 : public Foo
{   
    public:
   int   alpha() { return _alpha; }
   float beta()  { return _beta; }
private:
   int _alpha;
   float _beta;
}

class Foo2 : public Foo
{   
    typedef std::complex<float> cmplx;
public:
   cmplx  gamma() { return _gamma; }
   double delta()  { return _delta; }
private:
   cmplx  _gamma;
   double _delta;
}

class FooContainer
{
public:
   FooContainer() {   }
   ~FooContainer() {   }
   void addFoo(Foo* f) {_foos.push_back(f);}
private:
   boost::ptr_vector<Foo> _foos;
}

Then the client code need not change. According to the GUI command you can create Foo1 or Foo2 and add it to the single container. If necessary, you can use the dynamic_cast on Foo pointer to cast to Foo1 or Foo2. But, if you have written the client code properly, then this wouldn't be needed.

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Thank you for your help. It seems that (at least in my original code) I'll have to use dynamic_cast. I guess the real issue here is that I'll have to find a way to write my code so that I don't have to resort to dynamic casting. –  Iam Jul 6 '12 at 16:02
    
@Iam : I do not know much about your design. But, if you can encapsulate your actions which uses these accessor methods somehow inside the objects and this can be logically defined as the interface (Foo), then you will not need the dynamic_cast. –  PermanentGuest Jul 6 '12 at 17:13
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It sounds like you're looking to handle mixin-type functionality. To do that, you could use templates. This isn't run time in the sense that copies of each class will be generated, but it does save you the typing.

So for each decorator, do something like:

template<class TBase> class Decorator1 : public TBase
{
public:
    void NewMethod();
}

Then you can, for example:

Foo* d = new Decorator1<Foo1>(...);

Of course, the only way to make this work at runtime is to decide which type you're going to create. However, you still end up with the type Foo, Foo1 and Decorator1 so you can cast between them/use RTTI as you need to.

For more on this, see this article and this document


Although I've suggested it as a potential solution, I personally would be tempted to go with the polymorphism suggestion if at all possible - I think that makes for better, easier to maintain code because parts of class implementations aren't scattered all over the place using mixins. Just my two cents - if you think it works, go for it.

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That is an interesting way to save some typing. However I need this type of functionality during runtime so I do agree with you that polymorphism is the way to go. –  Iam Jul 6 '12 at 16:03
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the fundamental concept of a class is that it's encapsulated and hence that one cannot add members after the definition (though you can use polymorphism and create derived classes with additional members, but they cannot be called through pointer of the original class: you must cast them to derived which is dangerous), in particular not at run time.

So it seems to me you're requirement breaks the essential idea of OO programming. This suggests a simple solution: use non-member functions. They can be defined at any time, even run time (when you would also need to compile them). The overhead of the function pointer is the same as before (when you would need a pointer to a new member function).

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Unfortunately the program requires that I add new member variables to the class not new member functions. So I don't think that using non-member functions is a solution as these would only help me enhance the behavior of the class and not its actual stored variables. –  Iam Jul 6 '12 at 16:09
    
@Iam the same applies. members are members, whether functions, data, or types. –  Walter Jul 7 '12 at 20:02
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How about policy based templates? Have a template class Foo that takes a class as a template parameter. Then, have two methods that call the decorator methods:

tempate <class Decor>
class Foo
{
public:
    Foo() : { __d = Decor()  }
    ~Foo() {   }
    float member1() { return _member1; }
    Decor::method1type decoratorMember1() { return __d.getValueMethod1();}
    Decor::method2type decoratorMember2() { return __d.getValueMethod2();}
private: 
    float _member1;
    Decor __d;
    // other members etc...
}

Then, in your complex decorator:

class Decor1 {
  typedef std::complex<float> method1type;
  typedef double method2type;
public:
  method1type getValueMethod1() {return _gamma}
  method2type getValueMethod2() {return _delta}
private:
  method1type _gamma;
  method2type _delta;
}

Same for the other. This way, your Foo code can have anything added to it, even if it's already compiled. Just make a declarator class. And instead of instantiating Foo1, do this:

Foo<Decor1> f;
share|improve this answer
    
That would probably be a solution for a compile time problem. However I require run-time functionality and furthermore I need to have different _gamma, and _delta variables for each different Foo instance so static variables are out. Still your approach seems interesting. –  Iam Jul 6 '12 at 16:13
    
@Iam: You could change it so that the Decor class is instantiated by Foo. I'll edit. –  Linuxios Jul 6 '12 at 16:15
    
@Iam: I changed it to use instances of the Decorator. take a look. –  Linuxios Jul 6 '12 at 16:17
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