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Question

Will isolates in Dart run in parallel utilizing all available cores on a multiple core environment, or will it multiplex on a single core?

Background

Google has described isolates (a single-threaded unit of concurrency) in the Dart programming language as a "light weight thread" that operates on the main stack, without blocking.

Thus, it seems to me as it will only be able to multiplex on a single core and not be able to run in parallel over multiple cores in a SMP, dualcore, multicore or clustered environment.

Though, I can't find any information on this, hence my humble question.

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Did you run any experiments to figure this out ? –  High Performance Mark Jul 6 '12 at 14:03
    
It it doesn't have its own stack, it's not a thread. More like coroutine, maybe? If a 'thread' cannot block, it cannot wait for I/O or other threads. I don't see much of any upside to such a contraption <g> –  Martin James Jul 6 '12 at 14:19
    
Yes, indeed it is not a thread. I have just finished running some tests (silly me to not run them before I asked the question). –  Aron Cederholm Jul 6 '12 at 14:27
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Warning: This code is out of date, and does not work with Dart 1.0

Short answer:

  • Maybe

Long Answer

The dart:isolate library guide states: "Isolates might run in a separate process or thread, depending on the implementation. For web applications, isolates can be compiled to Web workers, if they are available." (my emphasis)

Running this code and observing your CPU load will tell you if your implementation does this or not.

#import('dart:isolate');
main() {
  for (var tmp = 0; tmp < 5; ++tmp) {
    SendPort sendPort = spawnFunction(runInIsolate);
    sendPort.call(tmp).then((reply) {
      print(reply);
    });
  }
}

runInIsolate() {
  port.receive((msg, SendPort reply) {
    var k = 0;
    var max = (5 - msg) * 100000000; 
    for (var i = 0; i < max; ++i) {
        i = ++i - 1;
        k = i;
    }
    reply.send("I received: $msg and calculated $k");
  });
}

The standalone dartvm will run isolates in parallell, utilizing all available cores. Browser implementations of dart will likely vary depending on whether Web Workers are implemented or not.

Edit: I updated the code for concurrency to work, thanks to patrick.

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1  
Wouldn't you need multiple isolates and therefore multiple spawnFunction() calls for concurrency? –  Patrick Jul 6 '12 at 15:49
    
Yes, you are indeed right. –  Aron Cederholm Jul 6 '12 at 16:04
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Here is updated code for Dart 1.0.

import 'dart:isolate';

main() {
  int counter = 0;

  ReceivePort receivePort = new ReceivePort();

  receivePort.listen((msg) {
    if (msg is SendPort) {
      msg.send(counter++);
    } else {
      print(msg);
    }
  });

  for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    Isolate.spawn(runInIsolate, receivePort.sendPort);
  }
}

runInIsolate(SendPort sendPort) {
  ReceivePort receivePort = new ReceivePort();
  sendPort.send(receivePort.sendPort);

  receivePort.listen((msg) {
    var k = 0;
    var max = (5 - msg) * 100000000; 
    for (var i = 0; i < max; ++i) {
        i = ++i - 1;
        k = i;
    }
    sendPort.send("I received: $msg and calculated $k");
  });
}
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I looked it up. The isolates seem to be actual threads.

'The only mechanism available to communicate between isolates is to pass messages.' - very good, except:

'Each isolate has its own heap, which means that all values in memory, including globals, are available only to that isolate.' not at all good... because of the messages:

'it is also possible to send object instances (which would be copied in the process)' very bad.

This scheme would seem to make it impossible to communicate large amounts of data from one 'isolate' to another without copying it, so eliminating efficient inter-'isolate' communication.

I would not use it because of this restriction that diallows the passing of large objects/buffers by address, as one would normally do with conventional threads.

Pity - it looked interesting at first because I use almost exclusively message-passing designs, but they knackered the inter-thread comms by insisting on only private heaps.

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The library docs state this: "Isolates might run in a separate process or thread, depending on the implementation. For web applications, isolates can be compiled to Web workers, if they are available." (My emphasis) –  Aron Cederholm Jul 6 '12 at 14:40
4  
I wouldn't worry about this that much. Dart people are surely aware of this issue, as it is Google Chrome who pioneers the concept of objects transferable between Web Workers (see updates.html5rocks.com/2011/12/…). I expect something like this to appear in Dart too. –  Ladicek Jul 10 '12 at 15:44
    
This is not a bug, but a feature to prevent one thread changing anything by ref that is used in a different thread. Rust does it the same way on purpose. D does not have separate heaps for every thread, but you cannot send anything by reference to a thread in D. –  Oliver Plow Jun 23 at 13:31
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