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i need to implement the following query in SQL Server

select *
from table1
WHERE  (CM_PLAN_ID,Individual_ID)
IN
(
 Select CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
)

but the WHERE..IN clause allows only 1 column. How to compare 2 or more columns with another inner select?

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migrated from serverfault.com Jul 16 '09 at 9:18

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7 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You can make a derived table from the subquery, and join table1 to this derived table:

select * from table1 INNER JOIN 
(
   Select CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID
   From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS
   Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
) table2
ON 
   table1.CM_PLAN_ID=table2.CM_PLAN_ID
   AND table1.Individual=table2.Individual

This only works if table2 does not contain duplicate pairs of CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID (such as if it's the PK). Otherwise you'll need to use DISTINCT.

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2  
or more generally SELECT * FROM table INNER JOIN otherTable ON ( table.x = otherTable.a AND table.y = otherTable.b) –  ala Jul 16 '09 at 7:56
    
What about the multiple rows that would exist if table 2 is a child of table 1? And why LEFT JOIN? –  gbn Jul 16 '09 at 8:18
    
@gbn: Thanks, you're right. Fixed that. –  sleske Jul 16 '09 at 8:21
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If you want for one table then use following query

SELECT S.* 
FROM Student_info S
  INNER JOIN Student_info UT
    ON S.id = UT.id
    AND S.studentName = UT.studentName
where S.id in (1,2) and S.studentName in ('a','b')

and table data as follow

id|name|adde|city
1   a   ad  ca
2   b   bd  bd
3   a   ad  ad
4   b   bd  bd
5   c   cd  cd

Then output as follow

id|name|adde|city
1   a   ad  ca
2   b   bd  bd
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Simple and wrong way would be combine two columns using + or concatenate and make one columns.

Select *
from XX
where col1+col2 in (Select col1+col2 from YY)

This would be offcourse pretty slow. Can not be used in programming but if in case you are just querying for verifying something may be used.

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2  
Indeed, and it can lead to errors, since e.g. 'ab' + 'c' = 'a'+'bc' –  Georg Scholz Aug 11 '13 at 18:17
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I founded easier this way

Select * 
from table1 
WHERE  (convert(VARCHAR,CM_PLAN_ID) + convert(VARCHAR,Individual_ID)) 
IN 
(
 Select convert(VARCHAR,CM_PLAN_ID) + convert(VARCHAR,Individual_ID)
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS 
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key 
) 

Hope this help :)

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6  
Ouch, no index use here do to the string concat. –  mrdenny Feb 3 '11 at 21:38
3  
I've voted this down as it's plain dangerous! If CM_PLAN_ID = 45 and Individual_ID = 3 then concatenation results in 453 - which is indistinguishable from the case where CM_PLAN_ID = 4 and Individual_ID = 53... asking for trouble I would have thought –  El Ronnoco Feb 25 '13 at 16:23
3  
..of course you could concatenate with an arbitrary special char eg 45_3 or 45:3 but it's still not a nice solution and of course as @mrdenny says indexes will not be utilised now that a transform has taken place on the columns. –  El Ronnoco Feb 25 '13 at 16:29
1  
I also voted this down, as this solution is really a quick "hack" only. It's slow and as El Ronnoco said, it can lead to bugs. –  Georg Scholz Aug 11 '13 at 18:16
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Why use WHERE EXISTS or DERIVED TABLES when you can just do a normal inner join:

SELECT t.*
FROM table1 t
INNER JOIN CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS s
    ON t.CM_PLAN_ID = s.CM_PLAN_ID
    AND t.Individual_ID = s.Individual_ID
WHERE s.Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key

If the pair of (CM_PLAN_ID, Individual_ID) isn't unique in the status table, you might need a SELECT DISTINCT t.* instead.

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2  
And the DISTINCT usually means an EXISTS is more efficient –  gbn Jul 16 '09 at 18:39
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You'll want to use the WHERE EXISTS syntax instead.

SELECT *
FROM table1
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT *
              FROM table2
              WHERE Lead_Key = @Lead_Key
                        AND table1.CM_PLAN_ID = table2.CM_PLAN_ID
                        AND table1.Individual_ID = table2.Individual_ID)
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While this would work, it converts the uncorrelated query in the question into a correlated query. Unless the query optimizer is clever, this might give you O(n^2) performance :-(. But maybe I'm underestimating the optimizer... –  sleske Jul 16 '09 at 7:50
    
I use syntaxes like this all the time without issue. Unless you are using an older optimizer (6.5, 7, 8, etc) it shouldn't have a problem with this syntax. –  mrdenny Jul 16 '09 at 8:09
    
@sleske: EXISTS is by far better: see my comments in my answer. And test it first,. @mrdenny: I misread your answer at first, I'd use EXISTS too –  gbn Jul 16 '09 at 8:17
1  
This is most efficient, +1. See this article in my blog for performance comparison: explainextended.com/2009/06/17/efficient-exists –  Quassnoi Jul 16 '09 at 14:46
    
Even SQL 2000 could handle most correlated subqueries without turning the query into an O(n^2). Might have been a problem back on 6.5. –  GilaMonster Jul 17 '09 at 7:02
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A simple EXISTS clause is cleanest

select *
from table1 t1
WHERE
EXISTS
(
 Select * --or 1. No difference.
 From CRM_VCM_CURRENT_LEAD_STATUS Ex
 Where Lead_Key = :_Lead_Key
-- correlation here
AND
t1.CM_PLAN_ID = Ex.CM_PLAN_ID AND t1.CM_PLAN_ID =  Ex.Individual_ID
)

If you have multiple rows in the correlation then a JOIN gives multiple rows in the output, so you'd need distinct. Which usually makes the EXISTS more efficient.

Note "SELECT" * with a JOIN would also include columns from the row limiting tables

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