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I'm trying to group data in sequence order. Say I have the following table:

| 1 | A |
| 1 | A |
| 1 | B |
| 1 | B |
| 1 | C |
| 1 | B |

I need the SQL query to output the following:

| 1 | A | 1 |
| 1 | A | 1 |
| 1 | B | 2 |
| 1 | B | 2 |
| 1 | C | 3 |
| 1 | B | 4 |

The last column is a group number that is incremented in each group. The important thing to note is that rows 3, 4 and 5 contain the same data which should be grouped into 2 groups not 1.

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Does the table have a unique identifier? –  Kevin Aenmey Jul 6 '12 at 14:39
2  
No way of reliably doing that unless there's a way to distinguish the order of the rows in the table. As it stands above, if the table is a heap, and then you add a clustered index, you'll could/should different results. You need to supply more information. –  Sean Jul 6 '12 at 14:44
    
you mean rows 3, 4 and 6 contain the same data. You should never rely on how a table data is stored. SQL doesn't work like that. Even if you know for sure that SQL Server 2005 always stores data in a certain way, that doesn't mean 2008 does too, or that 2014 will. If you want a specific order, then you need to set that in a column (maybe using timestamp for example) –  Rodolfo Jul 6 '12 at 14:57

2 Answers 2

The normal way you would do what you want is the dense_rank function:

select key, val,
       dense_rank() over (order by key, val)
from t

However, this does not address the problem of separating the last groups.

To handle this, I have to assume there is an "id" column. Tables, in SQL, do not have an ordering, so I need the ordering. If you are using SQL Server 2012, then you can use the lag() function to get what you need. Use the lag to see if the key, val pair is the same on consecutive rows:

with t1 as (
     select id, key, val,
            (case when key = lead(key, 1) over (order by id) and
                       val = lead(val, 1) over (order by id)
                  then 1
                  else 0
             end) as SameAsNext
     from t
    )
select id, key, val,
       sum(SameAsNext) over (order by id) as GroupNum
from t

Without SQL Server 2012 (which has cumulative sums), you have to do a self-join to identify the beginning of each group:

select t.*,
from t left outer join
     t tprev
     on t.id = t2.id + 1 and t.key = t2.key and t.val = t2.val
where t2.id is null

With this, assign the group as the minimum id using a join:

select t.id, t.key, t.val,
       min(tgrp.id) as GroupId
from t left outer join
     (select t.*,
      from t left outer join
           t tprev
           on t.id = t2.id + 1 and t.key = t2.key and t.val = t2.val
      where t2.id is null
    ) tgrp
    on t.id >= tgrp.id

If you want these to be consecutive numbers, then put them in a subquery and use dense_rank().

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This will give you rankings on your columns. It will not give you 1,2,3 however. It will give you 1,3,6 etc based on how many in each grouping

select 
a,
b,
rank() over (order by a,b)
 from
table1

See this SQLFiddle for a clearer idea of what I mean: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/0f201/2/0

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This won't quite work, unfortunately, as b isn't his 'order' key (which is either undefined or missing). –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 6 '12 at 15:24
    
good catch x-zero. i added a to the order by which seems to be working. –  Phil Vollhardt Jul 6 '12 at 17:18
    
Unfortunately, his key is missing completely. If you look a little more closely at his desired results, you should notice that he's expecting that last 'B' to come 'after' the 'C' - the ORDER BY you've specified will result in it coming before the 'C'. The OP seems to be relying on the order of the data in the table, which is an illusion at best. –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 6 '12 at 17:59

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