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When trying to compare software versions 5.12 to 5.8, version 5.12 is newer, however mathematically 5.12 is less than 5.8. How would I compare the two versions so that a newer version returns 'Y'?

SELECT CASE WHEN 5.12 > 5.8 THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END

Possible Solutions

  1. Add a 0 after the decimal in 5.8 so that it compares 5.08 to 5.12, however it seems like this would require a bit of code.
  2. Simply compare values after the decimal (ie. 12 > 8), however this fails when the version rolls to 6.0.
  3. Use reverse logic and assume that if 5.12 is less than 5.8 to return 'Y'. I believe this would fail when the version rolls to 6.0.
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2  
Version of SQL Server? If 2008+ DECLARE @V1 VARCHAR(10) = '5.12', @V2 VARCHAR(10) = '5.8';SELECT CASE WHEN CAST('/' + @V1 + '/' AS HIERARCHYID) > CAST('/' + @V2 + '/' AS HIERARCHYID) THEN 'Y' ELSE 'N' END –  Martin Smith Dec 18 '13 at 16:30
    
@MartinSmith You're late. –  Kermit Dec 18 '13 at 19:28

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted
declare @v1 varchar(100) = '5.12'
declare @v2 varchar(100) = '5.8'

select 
    case 
    when CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)-1)) < CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)-1)) then 'v2 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)-1)) > CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)-1)) then 'v1 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, substring(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)+1, LEN(@v1))) < CONVERT(int, substring(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)+1, LEN(@v1))) then 'v2 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, substring(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)+1, LEN(@v1))) > CONVERT(int, substring(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)+1, LEN(@v1))) then 'v1 is newer'
    else 'same!'

    end
share|improve this answer
    
And this can easily be extended out to n-part version numbers as necessary. –  DaveE Jul 19 '13 at 19:59

Two steps, first compare the left of the decimal point and after that compare the right.


Possible solution:

declare @v1 varchar(100) = '5.12'
declare @v2 varchar(100) = '5.8'

select case 
    when CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)-1)) < CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)-1)) then 'v2 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1)-1)) > CONVERT(int, LEFT(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2)-1)) then 'v1 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, RIGHT(@v1, LEN(@v1) - CHARINDEX('.', @v1))) < CONVERT(int, RIGHT(@v2, LEN(@v2) - CHARINDEX('.', @v2))) then 'v2 is newer'
    when CONVERT(int, RIGHT(@v1, LEN(@v1) - CHARINDEX('.', @v1))) > CONVERT(int, RIGHT(@v2, LEN(@v2) - CHARINDEX('.', @v2))) then 'v1 is newer'
    else 'same!' end as 'Version Test'
share|improve this answer
    
When data type is float, it does not work when the version ends in .0. –  Kermit Jul 6 '12 at 17:50

I recommend to create a SQL CLR function:

public partial class UserDefinedFunctions
{
    [SqlFunction(Name = "CompareVersion")] 
    public static bool CompareVersion(SqlString x, SqlString y)
    {
        return Version.Parse(x) > Version.Parse(y);
    }
}

Notes:

  • SqlString has explicit cast to string.
  • Pass full version string as of a.b.c.d
share|improve this answer

There was a very good solution from a duplicate question here: How to compare SQL strings that hold version numbers like .NET System.Version class?

After playing with the query for a while, I learned that it was not able to compare the last part when there are 4 or more parts (say, if the version number was 1.2.3.4, it would always treat the last one as 0). I have fixed that issue as well as came up with another function to compare two version numbers.

CREATE Function [dbo].[VersionNthPart](@version as nvarchar(max), @part as int) returns int as
Begin

Declare
    @ret as int = null,
    @start as int = 1,
    @end as int = 0,
    @partsFound as int = 0,
    @terminate as bit = 0

  if @version is not null
  Begin
    Set @ret = 0
    while @partsFound < @part
    Begin
      Set @end = charindex('.', @version, @start)
      If @end = 0 -- did not find the dot. Either it was last part or the part was missing.
      begin
        if @part - @partsFound > 1 -- also this isn't the last part so it must bail early.
        begin
            set @terminate = 1
        end
        Set @partsFound = @part
        SET @end = len(@version) + 1; -- get the full length so that it can grab the whole of the final part.
      end
      else
      begin
        SET @partsFound = @partsFound + 1
      end
      If @partsFound = @part and @terminate = 0
      begin
            Set @ret = Convert(int, substring(@version, @start, @end - @start))
      end
      Else
      begin
            Set @start = @end + 1
      end
    End
  End
  return @ret
End
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers]
(
    @Source nvarchar(max),
    @Target nvarchar(max),
    @Parts int = 4
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
/*
-1 : target has higher version number (later version)
0 : same
1 : source has higher version number (later version)
*/ 
    DECLARE @ReturnValue as int = 0;
    DECLARE @PartIndex as int = 1;
    DECLARE @SourcePartValue as int = 0;
    DECLARE @TargetPartValue as int = 0;
    WHILE (@PartIndex <= @Parts AND @ReturnValue = 0)
    BEGIN
        SET @SourcePartValue = [dbo].[VersionNthPart](@Source, @PartIndex);
        SET @TargetPartValue = [dbo].[VersionNthPart](@Target, @PartIndex);
        IF @SourcePartValue > @TargetPartValue
            SET @ReturnValue = 1
        ELSE IF @SourcePartValue < @TargetPartValue
            SET @ReturnValue = -1
        SET @PartIndex = @PartIndex + 1;
    END
    RETURN @ReturnValue
END

Usage/Test case:

declare @Source as nvarchar(100) = '4.9.21.018'
declare @Target as nvarchar(100) = '4.9.21.180'
SELECT [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers](@Source, @Target, DEFAULT) -- default version parts are 4

SET @Source = '1.0.4.1'
SET @Target = '1.0.1.8'
SELECT [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers](@Source, @Target, 4) -- typing out # of version parts also works

SELECT [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers](@Source, @Target, 2) -- comparing only 2 parts should be the same

SET @Target = '1.0.4.1.5'
SELECT [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers](@Source, @Target, 4) -- only comparing up to parts 4 so they are the same
SELECT [dbo].[CompareVersionNumbers](@Source, @Target, 5) -- now comparing 5th part which should indicate that the target has higher version number
share|improve this answer

Do not store in a string what is not a string. Alternative is creating your own data type (in C# - allowed for some time) that stored the versions as a sequence of bytes and implements proper comparison logic.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate what you mean by "Do not store in a string what is not a string?" –  Kermit Jul 6 '12 at 14:59
    
Simple 5.12 is NOT A STRING - it is a sequence of 2 numbers (5, 12). Stroring them in a varchar is forcing string semantics on that - which do not work. Storing them in a custom type means you can put proper semantics in. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms131120.aspx has details about that. –  TomTom Jul 6 '12 at 15:09
    
Perhaps I should have added that I am storing these as decimals. –  Kermit Jul 6 '12 at 15:11
    
As bad - they are NOT DECIMALS either, so you (a) waste space and (b) impose a wrong semantics over them. –  TomTom Jul 6 '12 at 15:19

You don't say so in the question, but your comment under Tomtom's answer suggests you are storing the version numbers as [decimals][d]. I guess that you have a table like this:

CREATE TABLE ReleaseHistory (
  VersionNumber DECIMAL(6,3) NOT NULL
);
GO

INSERT INTO ReleaseHistory (
  VersionNumber
)
VALUES
  (5.12),
  (5.8),
  (12.34),
  (3.14),
  (0.78),
  (1.0);
GO

The following query is an attempt to rank versions by the order in which they would be released:

SELECT
  VersionNumber,
  RANK() OVER (ORDER BY VersionNumber) AS ReleaseOrder
FROM ReleaseHistory;

It produces the following result set:

VersionNumber                           ReleaseOrder
--------------------------------------- --------------------
0.780                                   1
1.000                                   2
3.140                                   3
5.120                                   4
5.800                                   5
12.340                                  6

This is not what we expect. Version 5.8 was released before version 5.12!

Split the version number into its major and minor components to rank the version numbers properly. One way to do this is to convert the decimal value to a string and split on the period. The T-SQL syntax for this is ugly (the language is not designed for string processing):

WITH VersionStrings AS (
  SELECT CAST(VersionNumber AS VARCHAR(6)) AS VersionString
  FROM ReleaseHistory
),
VersionNumberComponents AS (
  SELECT
    CAST(SUBSTRING(VersionString, 1, CHARINDEX('.', VersionString) - 1) AS INT) AS MajorVersionNumber,
    CAST(SUBSTRING(VersionString, CHARINDEX('.', VersionString) + 1, LEN(VersionString) - CHARINDEX('.', VersionString)) AS INT) AS MinorVersionNumber
  FROM VersionStrings
)
SELECT
  CAST(MajorVersionNumber AS VARCHAR(3)) + '.' + CAST(MinorVersionNumber AS VARCHAR(3)) AS VersionString,
  RANK() OVER (ORDER BY MajorVersionNumber, MinorVersionNumber) AS ReleaseOrder
FROM VersionNumberComponents;

But it provides the expected result:

VersionString ReleaseOrder
------------- --------------------
0.780         1
1.0           2
3.140         3
5.120         4
5.800         5
12.340        6

As Tomtom replied, decimal is a not a good type to store a version number. It would be better to store the version number in two positive integer columns, one containing the major version number and the other containing the minor version number.

share|improve this answer
    
The current version number was compared to the version in a row, which was stored as a decimal. –  Kermit Jul 7 '12 at 2:42

As suggested by AF you can compare the int part and then the decimal part .Apart from all the answers given there is one more way to do it using parsename .You could try something like this

 case when cast(@var as int)>cast(@var2 as int) then 'Y' 
 when cast(PARSENAME(@var,1) as int) > cast(PARSENAME(@var2,1) as int) THEN 'Y'


 Declare @var float
 Declare @var2 float
 set @var=5.14
 set @var2=5.8
 Select case when cast(@var as int)>cast(@var2 as int) then 'Y' 
 when cast(PARSENAME(@var,1) as int)> cast(PARSENAME(@var2,1) as int) THEN 'Y'
 else 'N' END
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure if I'm not testing this correctly, but it seems to fail when @var = 5.14 and @var2 = 5.8. –  Kermit Jul 6 '12 at 15:44
    
I haven't executed the query but you can convert parsename to int example cast(PARSENAME(@var,1) as int .I have updated my answer !! –  praveen Jul 6 '12 at 15:48

This is based on SeanW's answer but this solution allows for the following format [major].[minor].[build]. It maybe used for SQL 2K and when cursor is not an option.

declare @v1 varchar(100) = '1.4.020'
declare @v2 varchar(100) = '1.4.003'

declare @v1_dot1_pos smallint   /*position - 1st version - 1st dot */
declare @v1_dot2_pos smallint   /*position - 1st version - 2nd dot */
declare @v2_dot1_pos smallint   /*position - 2nd version - 1st dot */
declare @v2_dot2_pos smallint   /*position - 2nd version - 2nd dot */

-------------------------------------------------
-- get the pos of the first and second dots
-------------------------------------------------
SELECT 
@v1_dot1_pos=CHARINDEX('.', @v1),
@v2_dot1_pos=CHARINDEX('.', @v2),
@v1_dot2_pos=charindex( '.', @v1, charindex( '.', @v1 ) + 1 ),
@v2_dot2_pos=charindex( '.', @v2, charindex( '.', @v2 ) + 1 )


-------------------------------------------------
-- break down the parts
-------------------------------------------------
DECLARE @v1_major int, @v2_major int
DECLARE @v1_minor int, @v2_minor int
DECLARE @v1_build int, @v2_build int 

SELECT 
    @v1_major = CONVERT(int,LEFT(@v1,@v1_dot1_pos-1)),
    @v1_minor = CONVERT(int,SUBSTRING(@v1,@v1_dot1_pos+1,(@v1_dot2_pos-@v1_dot1_pos)-1)),
    @v1_build = CONVERT(int,RIGHT(@v1,(LEN(@v1)-@v1_dot2_pos))),
    @v2_major = CONVERT(int,LEFT(@v2,@v2_dot1_pos-1)),
    @v2_minor = CONVERT(int,SUBSTRING(@v2,@v2_dot1_pos+1,(@v2_dot2_pos-@v2_dot1_pos)-1)),
    @v2_build = CONVERT(int,RIGHT(@v2,(LEN(@v2)-@v2_dot2_pos)))


-------------------------------------------------
-- return the difference
-------------------------------------------------
SELECT
    Case    
        WHEN @v1_major < @v2_major then 'v2 is newer'
        WHEN @v1_major > @v2_major then 'v1 is newer'
        WHEN @v1_minor < @v2_minor then 'v2 is newer'
        WHEN @v1_minor > @v2_minor then 'v1 is newer'
        WHEN @v1_build < @v2_build then 'v2 is newer'
        WHEN @v1_build > @v2_build then 'v1 is newer'
        ELSE '!Same'
    END
share|improve this answer

The solution that was implemented:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[version_compare]
(
    @v1 VARCHAR(5), @v2 VARCHAR(5)
)
RETURNS tinyint
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @v1_int tinyint, @v1_frc tinyint, 
            @v2_int tinyint, @v2_frc tinyint, 
            @ResultVar tinyint

    SET @ResultVar = 0

    SET @v1_int = CONVERT(tinyint, LEFT(@v1, CHARINDEX('.', @v1) - 1))
    SET @v1_frc = CONVERT(tinyint, RIGHT(@v1, LEN(@v1) - CHARINDEX('.', @v1)))
    SET @v2_int = CONVERT(tinyint, LEFT(@v2, CHARINDEX('.', @v2) - 1))
    SET @v2_frc = CONVERT(tinyint, RIGHT(@v2, LEN(@v2) - CHARINDEX('.', @v2)))

    SELECT @ResultVar = CASE
        WHEN @v2_int > @v1_int THEN 2
        WHEN @v1_int > @v2_int THEN 1
        WHEN @v2_frc > @v1_frc THEN 2
        WHEN @v1_frc > @v2_frc THEN 1
    ELSE 0 END

    -- Return the result of the function
    RETURN @ResultVar
END
GO
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protected by Kermit May 4 at 12:50

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