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I want to know what part of a huge file are cached in memory. I'm using some code from fincore for that, which works this way: the file is mmaped, then fincore loops over the address space and check pages with mincore, but it's very long (several minutes) because of the file size (several TB).

Is there a way to loop on used RAM pages instead? It would be much faster, but that means I should get the list of used pages from somewhere... However I can't find a convenient system call that would allow that.

Here comes the code:

#include <errno.h> 
#include <fcntl.h> 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <string.h> 
#include <sys/stat.h> 
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <unistd.h> 
/* } */

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <sys/sysinfo.h>


void
fincore(char *filename) {
   int fd;
   struct stat st;

   struct sysinfo info;
   if (sysinfo(& info)) {
    perror("sysinfo");
    return;
   }

   void *pa = (char *)0;
   char *vec = (char *)0;
   size_t pageSize = getpagesize();
   register size_t pageIndex;

   fd = open(filename, 0);
   if (0 > fd) {
      perror("open");
      return;
   }

   if (0 != fstat(fd, &st)) {
      perror("fstat");
      close(fd);
      return;
   }

   pa = mmap((void *)0, st.st_size, PROT_NONE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);
   if (MAP_FAILED == pa) {
      perror("mmap");
      close(fd);
      return;
   }

   /* vec = calloc(1, 1+st.st_size/pageSize); */
   /* 2.2 sec for 8 TB */
   vec = calloc(1, (st.st_size+pageSize-1)/pageSize);
   if ((void *)0 == vec) {
      perror("calloc");
      close(fd);
      return;
   }

    /* 48 sec for 8 TB */
   if (0 != mincore(pa, st.st_size, vec)) {
      fprintf(stderr, "mincore(%p, %lu, %p): %s\n",
              pa, (unsigned long)st.st_size, vec, strerror(errno));
      free(vec);
      close(fd);
      return;
   }

   /* handle the results */
   /* 2m45s for 8 TB */
   for (pageIndex = 0; pageIndex <= st.st_size/pageSize; pageIndex++) {
      if (vec[pageIndex]&1) {
         printf("%zd\n", pageIndex);
      }
   }

   free(vec);
   vec = (char *)0;

   munmap(pa, st.st_size);
   close(fd);

   return;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    fincore(argv[1]);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Mapping one 8 TB file requires 2 billion 4k pages. 48 seconds runtime of mincore means 44.7 Mpages/sec being examined. How much faster you think this could go? Printing out millions or billions of lines with printf() is also not the fastest thing in the world. –  Hristo Iliev Jul 6 '12 at 15:07
    
I don't hope getting mmap/mincore any faster than that; what I'd like is to reduce the loop length, possibly by scanning less pages... –  wazoox Jul 6 '12 at 15:42
    
printf is usually very slow operation. Replace it with something like activePages++ and see how much time it takes to process the loop. Mind that vec is still 2 GiB and even calling mincore might change the content of the cache as physical memory is being touched inside the virtual address space allocated to vec. –  Hristo Iliev Jul 6 '12 at 15:50
    
I've tried using a counter but it's exactly as slow as printf. –  wazoox Jul 6 '12 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

The amount of information needed to represent a list is, for the pessimistic case when all or almost all pages are indeed in RAM, much higher than the bitmap - at least 64 vs 1 bits per entry. If there was such an API, when querying it about your 2 billion pages, you would have to be prepared to get 16 GB of data in the reply. Additionally, handling variable-length structures such as lists is more complex than handling a fixed-length array, so library functions, especially low-level system ones, tend to avoid the hassle.

I am also not quite sure about the implementation (how the OS interacts with the TLB and Co in this case), but it may well be that (even size difference aside) filling out the bitmap can be performed faster than creating a list due to the OS- and hardware-level structures the information is extracted from.

If you are not concerned about very fine granularity, you could have a look at /proc/<PID>/smaps. For each mapped region it shows some stats, including how much is loaded into memory (Rss field). If for the purpose of debugging you map some regions of a file with a separate mmap() call (in addition to the main mapping used for performing the actual task), you will probably get separate entries in smaps and thus see separate statistics for these regions. You almost certainly can't make billions of mappings without killing your system, but if the file is structured well, maybe having separate statistics for just a few dozen well-chosen regions can help you find the answers you are looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried smaps indeed. However for some reason it doesn't report memory pages mapped by other processes, so it doesn't help me in this particular case. What I'm really looking for is access to the MMU virtual-to-physical addresses table :) –  wazoox Jul 6 '12 at 22:03

Cached by whom?

Consider after a boot the file sits on disk. No part of it is in memory.

Now the file is opened and random reads are performed.

The file system (e.g. the kernel) will be caching.

The C standard library will be caching.

The kernel will be caching in kernel-mode memory, the C standard library in user-mode memory.

If you could issue a query, it could also be that instantly after the query - before it returns to you - the cached data in question is removed from the cached.

share|improve this answer
    
It's an iscsi target, so it's cached by the kernel in the disk cache. I'd like to monitor the cache usage and evolution with time. –  wazoox Jul 6 '12 at 15:44

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