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JavaScript: why does parseInt(1/0, 19) return 18?

Why does parseInt(1/0, 19) evaluate to 18 in Javascript ? I understand 19 in not a permissible radix but still can someone tell how things are working here ?

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marked as duplicate by Dancrumb, T.J. Crowder, antyrat, Prince John Wesley, Jacob Mattison Jul 6 '12 at 15:21

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4  
Why are you dividing by zero? –  antyrat Jul 6 '12 at 15:17
    
+1, this is fascinating: parseInt(1/0, 15) --> NaN parseInt(1/0, 19) --> 18 parseInt(1/0, 20) --> 18 parseInt(1/0, 25) --> 185011843 parseInt(1/0, 28) --> 324267766 –  Claudiu Jul 6 '12 at 15:18
    
Let's say I am passing an expression to parseInt taken from user & he may type whatever he feels like. It hurts to cover corner cases but still someone has to. –  tea_totaler Jul 6 '12 at 15:19
    
19 is a permissible radix... a more pertinent question is, why are you converting to base-19? –  Dancrumb Jul 6 '12 at 15:19
    
Thanks for pointing to the right place. :) –  tea_totaler Jul 6 '12 at 15:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ah, quick javascript consoling led to the answer:

> 1/0
Infinity
> parseInt("Infinity", 19)
18

parseInt seems to convert the first argument to a string, e.g.:

> parseInt(11, 2)
3

so, it's converting the string "Infinity", which explains everything.

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