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I would like to return the RATE that is 5 months prior to the EFFECTIVE_DATE. If that date is on a Saturday then I would like to move the EFF_DATE back 1 day so that the EFFECTIVE_DATE is on a Friday. This is the code I am using but it so far returns no values:

DEFINE EFF_DATE = TO_DATE('05/31/2012','MM/DD/RRRR')
SELECT RATE, EFFECTIVE_DATE
FROM RATES_ALL
WHERE EFFECTIVE_DATE IN
  CASE 
    WHEN TO_CHAR(add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5), 'DAY') = 'SATURDAY'
    THEN 
      (
        SELECT EFFECTIVE_DATE 
        FROM RATES_ALL 
        WHERE EFFECTIVE_DATE = add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5)-1
      )
    END;
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It doesn't look like you have a case for when it's NOT Saturday –  Jodaka Jul 6 '12 at 15:59
    
Does this code generate an error? "in case" is a very unusual construct. –  Gordon Linoff Jul 6 '12 at 16:00
    
That is step 2. I know for a fact that 5 months prior to 05/31/2012 is a saturday, so I'm trying to get it to work in this instance first. –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 16:01
    
@GordonLinoff the query never finishes. I've had it running for some time and it hasn't stopped yet. –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 16:01
    
@Gordon, the syntax is legal. –  DCookie Jul 6 '12 at 16:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't know Oracle, but assuming that the reason you check for Saturdays is because there's no entry in the RATES_ALL table for Saturdays, then why not simply something like:

SELECT RA1.RATE, RA1.EFFECTIVE_DATE
FROM RATES_ALL RA1
WHERE RA1.EFFECTIVE_DATE = add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5)
   OR (RA1.EFFECTIVE_DATE = add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5)-1
   AND NOT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM RATES_ALL RA2
                  WHERE RA2.EFFECTIVE_DATE = add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5))
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Perfect and simple. I'm not sure why I didn't think of this myself. Thank you! –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 17:59

It would be much easier I think to have an inner query that returns both records from 5 months ago, and from 5 months and a day ago, and then in an outer query you select the max result from the inner query where the day isn't a saturday.

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I like your solution. But I'm still curious as to why my code would not work. –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 16:30

With your subquery having equals in it you are only going to get a match if there is a ROW in RATES_ALL with a date that is exactly 5 months prior.

Are you sure your table will always have a row that has a date 5 months prior? For example (not sure if this is what you want, but this will return the most recent /latest row at least 5 months prior):

    SELECT MAX(EFFECTIVE_DATE) 
    FROM RATES_ALL 
    WHERE EFFECTIVE_DATE <= add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5)-1
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I would like the query to test the date first to ensure it is not a Saturday. If it is, I want the input date to go back 1 (-1) so it will be a Friday. My table will always contain a date that is a Friday. –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 17:05

Are the dates in RATES_ALL.EFFECTIVE_DATE just dates, or do they have times as well? You may need something like:

SELECT RATE, EFFECTIVE_DATE 
  FROM RATES_ALL 
 WHERE EFFECTIVE_DATE IN   
       CASE
         WHEN TRIM(TO_CHAR(add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5), 'DAY')) = 'SATURDAY'
           THEN
            (
              SELECT MAX(EFFECTIVE_DATE)
                FROM RATES_ALL
               WHERE TRUNC(EFFECTIVE_DATE) = add_months(&&EFF_DATE, -5)-1
            ) 
       END; 

EDIT: Okay, here's why your code does not work:

From the documentation, DAY format model is "Name of day, padded with blanks to display width of the widest name of day in the date language used for this element." So, the output of your TO_CHAR function reference is actually 'SATURDAY ' (note the space on the end). You'll have to TRIM the output of the TO_CHAR function in your WHEN clause (see above for edited query).

You will also need an aggregate function in your SELECT to return a single row in the CASE statement, such as MAX.

Re-tested:

WITH rates_all AS
  (SELECT TO_DATE('05/31/2012','MM/DD/RRRR') effective_date, 1 rate from dual
   UNION
   SELECT TO_DATE('12/30/2011','MM/DD/RRRR'), 2 FROM dual
   UNION 
   SELECT TO_DATE('12/30/2011','MM/DD/RRRR'), 3 FROM dual)
SELECT RATE, EFFECTIVE_DATE
  FROM RATES_ALL
 WHERE EFFECTIVE_DATE IN
       CASE
         WHEN TRIM(TO_CHAR(add_months(TO_DATE('05/31/2012','MM/DD/RRRR') , -5), 'DAY')) = 'SATURDAY' THEN
           (SELECT MAX(EFFECTIVE_DATE)
              FROM RATES_ALL
             WHERE TRUNC(EFFECTIVE_DATE) = 
                   add_months(TO_DATE '05/31/2012','MM/DD/RRRR') , -5)-1)
         END;

      RATE EFFECTIVE_DATE
---------- --------------
         2 12/30/2011
         3 12/30/2011
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Unfortunately, no. The Effective_Dates hold just a date. I have run a simple query to check if my nested query works on its own. It does, but not when placed in the THEN clause of my Case statement. –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 16:22
    
very well explained. However now it throws an error code: ORA-01427:single-row subquery returns more than one row –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 17:01
    
It seems you need a simple expression in the CASE statement. You'll need to apply an aggregate function like MAX to the SELECT statement. See edit. –  DCookie Jul 6 '12 at 17:08
    
I've been trying to execute the code for about 25 minutes now. But it isn't completing the query. Any reason for it taking such a long time and is due to the way the code is written? –  AD27 Jul 6 '12 at 17:36
    
It probably is. How many rows are in RATES_ALL? Is effective_date indexed? And even if it is, any functions applied to the column in the where clause would likely cause the index to be unusable. Elimnate the TRUNC inside the CASE for starters if it's truly not necessary. –  DCookie Jul 6 '12 at 17:43

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