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Does a Java PathIterator give you the points of a Polygon in clockwise or counterclockwise order?

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According to the PathIterator API, Moves the iterator to the next segment of the path forwards along the primary direction of traversal as long as there are more points in that direction. – Conor Sherman Jul 6 '12 at 16:37
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It "walks" in the order the points are defined in the polygon. Consider the following code sample I just whipped up:

c:\files\j>java ShapeTest
Walking clockwise
Currently at: 2.0 5.0
Currently at: 4.0 4.0
Currently at: 4.0 1.0
Currently at: 0.0 1.0
Currently at: 0.0 3.0
Walking counter-clockwise
Currently at: 0.0 3.0
Currently at: 0.0 1.0
Currently at: 4.0 1.0
Currently at: 4.0 4.0
Currently at: 2.0 5.0

is produced by

import java.awt.Polygon;
import java.awt.geom.PathIterator;
class ShapeTest {
    /**
     * Use points to make a pentagon
              . 2,5
        0,3 .   . 4,3
        0,1 .   . 4,1

     */
    public static void main(String...args) {
        // from the top clockwise
        int[] xClock = new int[] { 2,4,4,0,0 };
        int[] yClock = new int[] { 5,4,1,1,3 };

        // the reverse order from the clockwise way
        int[] xCounter = new int[] { 0,0,4,4,2 };
        int[] yCounter = new int[] { 3,1,1,4,5 };

        Polygon clock = new Polygon(xClock, yClock, 5);
        Polygon counter = new Polygon(xCounter, yCounter, 5);

        int index = 0;

        System.out.println("Walking clockwise");
        PathIterator clockIter = clock.getPathIterator(null);

        while(!clockIter.isDone() && index < clock.npoints) {
            float[] coords = new float[6];
            clockIter.currentSegment(coords);
            System.out.println("Currently at: " + coords[0] + " " + coords[1]);
            clockIter.next();
            index++;
        }

        index = 0;

        System.out.println("Walking counter-clockwise");
        PathIterator counterIter = counter.getPathIterator(null);
        while(!counterIter.isDone() && index < counter.npoints) {
            float[] coords = new float[6];
            counterIter.currentSegment(coords);
            System.out.println("Currently at: " + coords[0] + " " + coords[1]);
            counterIter.next();
            index++;
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For the record, I have no idea why those 0.0 0.0 parts show up. If anyone knows and could edit and leave a comment, I'd appreciate it... this was just a simple example, so I didn't put much into it, but yeah... – corsiKa Jul 6 '12 at 16:59
    
Well, what do ya know... a year and a half later, someone comes along and goes "wait, that isn't right..." and fixes it! Awesome. – corsiKa Jan 31 '14 at 3:44
    
Just an extra note. I tested and it seems if you create an Area from a path and get the PathIterator from that then it will be always CCW. – clankill3r Feb 12 '15 at 10:07

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