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I've got a generator and a function that consumes it:

def read():
    while something():
        yield something_else()

def process():
    for item in read():
        do stuff

If the generator throws an exception, I want to process that in the consumer function and then continue consuming the iterator until it's exhausted. Note that I don't want to have any exception handling code in the generator.

I thought about something like:

reader = read()
while True:
    try:
        item = next(reader)
    except StopIteration:
        break
    except Exception as e:
        log error
        continue
    do_stuff(item)

but this looks rather awkward to me.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

When a generator throws an exception, it exits. You can't continue consuming the items it generates.

Example:

>>> def f():
...     yield 1
...     raise Exception
...     yield 2
... 
>>> g = f()
>>> next(g)
1
>>> next(g)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in f
Exception
>>> next(g)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration

If you control the generator code, you can handle the exception inside the generator; if not, you should try to avoid an exception occurring.

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1  
Thanks! This appears to be the case. Could you take a look at the follow-up question: stackoverflow.com/q/11366892/989121 ? –  georg Jul 6 '12 at 17:22

This is also something that I am sure if I handle correctly/elegantly.

What I do is to yield an Exception from the generator, and then raise it somewhere else. Like:

class myException(Exception):
    def __init__(self, ...)
    ...

def g():
    ...
    if everything_is_ok:
        yield result
    else:
        yield myException(...)

my_gen = g()
while True:
    try:
        n = next(my_gen)
        if isinstance(n, myException):
            raise n
    except StopIteration:
        break
    except myException as e:
        # Deal with exception, log, print, continue, break etc
    else:
        # Consume n

This way I still carry over the Exception without raising it, which would have caused the generator function to stop. The major drawback is that I need to check the yielded result with isinstance at each iteration. I don't like a generator which can yield results of different types, but use it as a last resort.

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1  
Thanks, this is similar to what I ended up doing (see this answer) –  georg Jan 16 at 10:00
    
Thanks @georg for pointing out that answer. Yielding a tuple with Exception is, I think, a better solution. –  dojuba Jan 18 at 10:44

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