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I was wondering if it would be possible to do the following:

template <typename T>
namespace basic_foo {
    struct str {
        T value;
    };
}

basic_foo<char>::str s1;
namespace foo = basic_foo<char>;
foo::str s2;

Is it possible to do this in any c++ compiler?
Is there work being done to implement this?
I think that it would be a great addition to the language.

Thanks in advance.

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Why can't you just make a templated struct inside the namespace –  Wug Jul 6 '12 at 16:45
    
This would be a nice feature to have. –  Paul Manta Jul 6 '12 at 16:47
    
@Wug: Koenig lookup –  Ben Voigt Jul 6 '12 at 16:48

4 Answers 4

No, you cannot define a namespace template. You can, however, achieve almost exactly what you want (with only slightly different syntax), by making basic_foo a class template:

template <typename T>
struct basic_foo {
    struct str {
        T value;
    };
};

basic_foo<char>::str s1;
typedef basic_foo<char> foo;
foo::str s2;
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Close, but no argument-dependent lookup. –  Ben Voigt Jul 6 '12 at 16:50
    
@BenVoigt: basic_foo<T>::str can declare friends, which will be found via ADL. (You are right, though, it's not exactly the same.) –  James McNellis Jul 6 '12 at 16:52
2  
@BenVoigt: Yes, friends of basic_foo<T> would be found. See gist.github.com/3061359. g++ 4.7 and Visual C++ 2012 RC both accept it (which is usually a good sign). –  James McNellis Jul 6 '12 at 17:04
1  
Another difference is that you can't use a using-directive inside the struct. –  ndkrempel Jul 6 '12 at 17:13
2  
@JamesMcNellis: The friend approach is close but not exactly the same. A free function friend declaration provides a declaration of a namespace level function but only within the enclosing class. The corner case now moves to the fact that at friend defined inside the class definition (and not explicitly declared at namespace level) can only be found by ADL, which in turn means that you cannot obtain a pointer to it, which in turn means that you cannot pass it to algorithms... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 6 '12 at 17:16

No, but you can use templated struct:

template<typename T>
struct basic_foo
{
    struct str
    {
        T value;
    };
};

typedef basic_foo<char> foo;
foo::str s1;

You could also use class instead of struct, but you would have to remember about public: in such case.

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No. It`s impossible, namespace template is unreal, but you can make class template.

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The other answers explain how to do what it looks like you might want. But it sounds like you have a different idea of what a namespace is for than what it really is designed for.

namespace solves the problem of two unrelated C++ code bases being able to communicate with each other. C doesn't have namespaces and is much more verbose as a result. Try using a 3rd party library such as openssl or oauth in C. You'll find a lot of function calls like this:

openssl_create
openssl_connect

and so on. And this is really, really important. Because chances are I want to write a function called connect. And so does the author of the ZMQ library I used. And so forth. And it's a major, major pain to have two functions with the same name trying to be called in the same place...

namespace is purely a software engineering construct, not a programming one. It lets the prefix openssl_ simply become the namespace so code like the above can intermingle more freely. Why don't namespaces conflict? This is where software engineering becomes even more human and social, as essentially the global programming community must make sure this doesn't happen. Generally outer namespaces are usually companies; I would guess all Google internal code is in namespace Google. Java solves this by promoting the convention of naming package (like namespace) by the internet domain name, which is presumably a real-world entity that can't conflict, e.g. Google code should live in package com.google...

I should also note that within an organization namespaces are used at the application, or product, or team level - e.g. Google Drive probably has a function "upload" somewhere as does Google Mail, and those teams might generally not talk to each other... but still need to write intermingling code. That's what namespaces do. Nothing more, nothing less.

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