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Today I explored a weird behavior of Python. An example:

closures = []
for x in [1, 2, 3]:
    # store `x' in a "new" local variable
    var = x

    # store a closure which returns the value of `var'
    closures.append(lambda: var)

for c in closures:
    print(c())

The above code prints

3
3
3

But I want it to print

1
2
3

I explain this behavior for myself that var is always the same local variable (and python does not create a new one like in other languages). How can I fix the above code, so that each closure will return another value?

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marked as duplicate by pst, Sven Marnach, Joel Cornett, Andrew Clark, JBernardo Jul 6 '12 at 17:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Hint: what introduces a new variable scope in Python? –  user166390 Jul 6 '12 at 16:49
    
just saw that stackoverflow.com/questions/7546285/… is a duplicate question. how can I close this one or shall I delete it? –  tampis Jul 6 '12 at 16:49
    
@tampis: Just vote to close – the moderators will eventually decide whether this question is merged or deleted. –  Sven Marnach Jul 6 '12 at 16:51
    
Actually, I don't think that that even does what you think it does. Try adding del var after the first loop. –  cha0site Jul 6 '12 at 16:53
    
@cha0site del var gives the exception lobal name 'var' is not defined –  tampis Jul 6 '12 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The easiest way to do this is to use a default argument for your lambda, this way the current value of x is bound as the default argument of the function, instead of var being looked up in a containing scope on each call:

closures = []
for x in [1, 2, 3]:
    closures.append(lambda var=x: var)

for c in closures:
    print(c())

Alternatively you can create a closure (what you have is not a closure, since each function is created in the global scope):

make_closure = lambda var: lambda: var
closures = []
for x in [1, 2, 3]:
    closures.append(make_closure(x))

for c in closures:
    print(c())

make_closure() could also be written like this, which may make it more readable:

def make_closure(var):
    return lambda: var
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1  
+1 for nice explanation –  Jon Clements Jul 6 '12 at 16:53

You can't create a new variable in the local scope inside the loop. Whatever name you choose, your function will always be a closure over that name and use its most recent value.

The easiest way around this is to use a keyword argument:

closures = []
for x in [1, 2, 3]:
    closures.append(lambda var=x: var)
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Thanks for the edit, that is okay for a +1 now. –  user166390 Jul 6 '12 at 16:56

In your example, var is always bound to the the last value of the loop. You need to bind it inside the lambda using closures.append(lambda var=var: var).

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