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First I should note that my dual monitors are in custom position rather than the default left-to-right.

I was attempting to create a full-screen exclusive mode game, but in testing I noticed that when I used EXIT_ON_CLOSE (and in System.exit), that the monitor setup would be reset to the default left-to-right. But when I used DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE (and for just a dispose()) it would be perfectly normal when returning to my desktop. Is this acceptable practice, or is there something I'm missing?

Relevant part:

import java.awt.GraphicsDevice;
import java.awt.GraphicsEnvironment;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;

public class FullScreenTest extends JFrame {

    public FullScreenTest() {
        GraphicsDevice screen = GraphicsEnvironment.
              getLocalGraphicsEnvironment().getDefaultScreenDevice();
        add(new JLabel("Test"));
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);

        screen.setFullScreenWindow(this);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        FullScreenTest test = new FullScreenTest();
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

But when I used DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE (and for just a dispose()) it would be perfectly normal when returning to my desktop

That is good. Stick with it. Many developers use EXIT_ON_CLOSE when it is entirely unnecessary.

If DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE does not work to end the JRE, it means that other GUI elements are still visible, or other non-daemon threads are running. In that case, it would generally be better to explicitly end the other threads, or check they can safely be ended.

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Ah, perfect, thank you. Is there an easy way that I'm missing to check for other elements, or is it alright to just keep track and close manually? –  DesjardinsM Jul 6 '12 at 17:24
    
In testing with an applet or JWS app. it is simple, configure the Java Console to pop up for them, and wait till it closes. As a more general solution, you might examine the OS applet for viewing running processes. It should appear as a 'Java' process AFAIR. –  Andrew Thompson Jul 6 '12 at 17:30
    
very nice answer –  mKorbel Jul 6 '12 at 17:34
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I have read through it, but I'm a complete novice so I'm not sure I've gotten all of it grasped yet. However the examples on the tutorial are producing the same effect as mine was as well. –  DesjardinsM Jul 6 '12 at 17:04
    
@DesjardinsM hmmm not sure from your question but Java doesn't supporting fullscreen on dual-monitor –  mKorbel Jul 6 '12 at 17:20
    
I wasn't needing it to go fullscreen on both, was just wondering if disposing was alright to do so that I could get my monitor configuration to stay as it was. –  DesjardinsM Jul 6 '12 at 17:22

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