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Is there a special method that you can add if you get an i++ type of operation on a property?

Here is an example of what I'm trying to do. I know this don't work, but this gives you an idea of what I'm talking about. Actually, I'm working with two internals and I want to increase one on + and the other on -.

int mynum;
int yournum 
{
    get{ return mynum; }
    set{ mynum = value; }
    set++{ mynum = mynum + 5; return mynum; } //this is what I want to do
}
// elsewhere in the program
yournum++; //increases by 5
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Can you explain a bit more? I don't understand what you're asking. –  Kirk Woll Jul 6 '12 at 17:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want to override the behavior which occurs when ++ is invoked on the property yournum. If so that's not possible in C# for exactly the code you outlined in your sample. The ++ operator should be incrementing by 1 and every user calling yournum++ would expect that behavior. To change it silently to 5 would certainly lead to user confusion

It would be possible to get similar behavior by defining a type with a custom ++ operator which did the + 5 conversion instead of +1. For example

public struct StrangeInt
{
    int m_value;

    public StrangeInt(int value)
    {
        m_value = value;
    }

    public static implicit operator StrangeInt(int i)
    {
        return new StrangeInt(i);
    }

    public static implicit operator int(StrangeInt si)
    {
        return si.m_value;
    }

    public static StrangeInt operator++(StrangeInt si)
    {
        return si.m_value + 5;
    }
}

If you now defined yourname to be StrangeInt then you would get the behavior you were looking for

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How do I overload the get for the struct (so I can work on the return value)? This is actually part of my problem I'm working on, though I was in a hurry when I wrote the example and didn't have time to include everything. Also, do the operators have to be static? Or is there a reason for doing so? –  Arlen Beiler Jul 6 '12 at 17:49
    
@ArlenBeiler I'm not quite sure what you mean by "overload the get". If you're trying to overload how the property get works on a given type that's not possible. As for the operators yes they have to be static. As to why that's just how C# defines them. Likely an issue of consistency. –  JaredPar Jul 6 '12 at 17:51
    
Thanks a lot. Here is my final code: stackoverflow.com/a/11367723/258482 And it does make sense to make the operators static. :) –  Arlen Beiler Jul 6 '12 at 18:28

Yes but (always a but)... the property type can't be int, you would need to return a custom proxy type which implicitly converts to int but overrides operators.

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There's no way to do this directly. One way to provide this (if you really need it), would be to provide your own type instead of int and use operator overloading to implement the functionality you need.

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If you want to override the ++ operator for integers then that won't unfortunately be possible.

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Create your own struct and overload the operator:

    public static YourType operator++(YourType t)
    {
            // increment some properties of t here
            return t;
    }
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Many thanks to JaredPar for his excellent answer. Here is the end result if anyone is interested. It is to calculate a percentage based on two numbers in order to add weight (hence the name) as more numbers come in.

public struct Weight
{
    int posWeight;
    int negWeight;
    int Weight
    {
        get
        {
            if (posWeight + negWeight == 0) //prevent div by 0
                return 0;
            else return posWeight / (posWeight + negWeight);
        }
    }
    public static Weight operator ++(Weight num)
    {
        num.posWeight++;
        if (num.posWeight > 2000000) //prevent integer overflow
        {
            num.posWeight = num.posWeight / 2;
            num.negWeight = num.negWeight / 2;
        }
        return num;
    }
    public static Weight operator --(Weight num)
    {
        num.negWeight++;
        if (num.negWeight > 2000000) //prevent integer overflow
        {
            num.posWeight = num.posWeight / 2;
            num.negWeight = num.negWeight / 2;
        }
        return num;
    }
    public static explicit operator int(Weight num) 
    { // I'll make this explicit to prevent any problems.
        return num.Weight;
    }
}
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Not possible using a primitive type. What I would do instead is add an extension method to int -- something like:

public static int plusFive(this int myInt)
{
    return myInt + 5;
}

then, to use it, you can just do something like:

int a,b;
a = 5;
b = a.plusFive();
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