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I have defined my Root.plist inside Setting bundle which appears in the device settings. Now, I want it to display different options based on the kind of environment I build the project on.

I have defined a TEST and PROD schemes (different build configuration) in XCode and I want Root.plist to be defined differently for these build configuration. How can this be done?

Can we have 2 plists defined and link them with different build configuration or can we modify the root.plist at the compile time based on the build configuration or scheme chosen.

Please advise.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have worked it out this way:

1) Add 2 settings bundle (one for test and one for prod) to the project and add them to the target.

2) Add a Run script on the Runner target to selectively copy the required Settings bundle into the build file.

if [IS_PRODUCTION]; then
cp -r ${PROJECT_DIR}/Settings/Prod/Settings.bundle ${BUILT_PRODUCTS_DIR}/${PRODUCT_NAME}.app
fi

if [IS_TEST]; then
cp -r ${PROJECT_DIR}/Settings/Test/Settings.bundle ${BUILT_PRODUCTS_DIR}/${PRODUCT_NAME}.app
fi

3) Once done, just run on different schemes to see the desired results.

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I do something similar to @Abhinav, but instead of using a run script, I just use the Target Membership section of the File inspector to determine which target uses which Settings.bundle.

Settings Bundle Target Membership

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The only way to conditionally bundle items such as a settings bundle in different builds would be to duplicate your target. Simply add in the right bundle to the right target, and keep all the code the same. It's different, but it should work a lot better for you in the long run.

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