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I use this code

#define _(x) cout << #x;

as macro, at the beginning of the program, to return a variable name. It functions well in main, but not at all when nested in other funcions. For example if a define

void print (int p)
{
   _(p); cout << "=" << p;
}

int main()
{
   int a=1, b=2;
   _(a); 
   cout << " = " << a;
   print(b);
}

the output will be a = 1 p = 2

Any idea to overcome this?

share|improve this question
    
but that's exactly what to expect. Your first variable is named a, the second is named p – kratenko Jul 6 '12 at 18:48
2  
Why? Why> Why is one interested in the name of the variable name? – Ed Heal Jul 6 '12 at 18:49
    
What output do you expect? – nav_jan Jul 6 '12 at 18:49
1  
He is expecting a b=2 on the output but it doesn't work because his macro is made to spit out the variable name which changes according to the scope that he is operating in. In your sub functions the compiler considers the name of the variable to be the local scope variable name and will connect those compile symbols on linking to higher levels of the scope. The only way that I can think of to store the name of the variable is to call your macro from the same scope and then hand it into a class constructor or other function to maintain the varaible. – Rusty Weber Jul 6 '12 at 18:56
3  
@Wug - A debugger is easier and works. – Ed Heal Jul 6 '12 at 19:01
#define _(x) cout << #x;
#define print(v) _(v); cout << "=" << v;

The reason it's not behaving the way you expect is when you call it from inside your function, the variable's name is "p". So it's doing exactly what you told it, even if it's not what you meant.

share|improve this answer
    
This will work if the asker truly only needs to print from any sub function. Not that it's a bad Idea if that is the case, but if the asker has a variety of things that he want to accomplish from multiple sub-functions, he would have to provide a macro for each, and that would also destroy the capacity for recursion as well as make the size of his executable very large depending on how many times he needs to call his function. – Rusty Weber Jul 6 '12 at 19:02
    
Yes, thanks very much. This was the outcome i desired, I understood what was the problem, mayble i didn't express myself well, but i didn't had a clue on what to do. – Temitope.A Jul 6 '12 at 19:06
    
I'm only doing some exercises to improve in c++. I understand it's something a little out of the flow. – Temitope.A Jul 6 '12 at 19:08
2  
@user1507571 : A good place to start in improving in C++ is to avoid macros. ;-] – ildjarn Jul 6 '12 at 19:58

This appears to be working correctly. The values of a and p are 1 and 2, respectively, which is exactly what your output shows. What output are you expecting?

If you're expecting the second output to be b = 2, then I think you have a fundamental misunderstanding of the language. The function has no knowledge of the variable name that the calling function used (if it used a variable at all) when calling it. Higher-level languages with pervasive introspection capabilities might be able to do something like this, but C++ can't.

Perhaps more importantly, what do you gain by knowing the name of the variable that you don't already know by looking at the code or running the code in a basic debugger?

share|improve this answer

It sounds like you want the name of the variable to be part of the variable itself. C++ does not give variables names at runtime. The identifiers you use in the program refer only to the values getting passed around.

You can define an object type that explicitly includes a name:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

template< typename t >
struct named_value {
    t value;
    std::string name;
};

template< typename t >
void _( named_value< t > const &nv ) { // not a good name for a function
    std::cout << nv.name; // not a good semantic for a function
}

template< typename t >
std::ostream &operator<< ( std::ostream &s, named_value< t > const &v ) {
    return s << v.value;
}

typedef named_value< int > named_int;

void print (named_int p)
{
   _(p); std::cout << "=" << p;
}

int main()
{
   named_int a = { 1, "a" }, b = { 2, "b" };
   _(a); 
   std::cout << " = " << a;
   print(b);
}

http://ideone.com/AFHEq

BUT, you really shouldn't write programs like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Call me old fashioned, I use templates for last resort. i.e. want a family of classes that have similar properties - like stacks, queues – Ed Heal Jul 6 '12 at 19:11
    
@EdHeal There's no reason to think he only wants to name his ints. Is there an advantage to avoiding the template here? – Potatoswatter Jul 6 '12 at 19:12
    
Yes - code that is readable and maintainable. – Ed Heal Jul 6 '12 at 19:14
    
@EdHeal Because defining a separate class for every case would accomplish that. Thanks for the laugh. – Potatoswatter Jul 6 '12 at 19:16
    
You could do that - but that is not I am advocating. You are simply not doing this. One thinks that the thing you care about is your job security. – Ed Heal Jul 6 '12 at 19:20

You would need to pass the info into the print function somehow.

struct named {
    int &x_;
    const char *n_;
    operator int () const { return x_; }
    named(int &x, const char *n) : x_(x), n_(n) {}
};

const char * name (int, const char *s) { return s; }
const char * name (named &n, const char *s) { return n.n_; }

#define _(x) std::cout << name(x, #x)

void print (named p) {
    _(p); std::cout << " = " << p << std::endl;
}
#define print(x) print(named(x, #x))

int main() {
   int a=1, b=2;
   _(a); std::cout << " = " << a << std::endl;
   print(b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm gratefull to you all, I understood a lot of things. Like I said, I'm only doing some exercises. I defined a class of points, and needed to "print" the points in this format "P(x,y)". I thought this was a good idea to make the program shorter and more readable, instead of, for every point writing _(P); cout << '('<<p.get_x()<<','<<p.get_y()<< ')'; I could instead write print(P) – Temitope.A Jul 6 '12 at 19:19
    
@user1507571: My updated solution sort of lets you do that. – jxh Jul 6 '12 at 19:24
    
@user1507571: But it sounds like Wug's solution is what you actually want: make print a macro. – jxh Jul 6 '12 at 19:36

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