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I have a strange problem using Generics in Java. Generics are quite new to me, but I think I understand the basics.

Please have a look at this piece of code:

private void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(QuadTree<?> node) {
    if (node == null)
        return;

    Vector3 min = node.bbox.min;
    Vector3 max = node.bbox.max;
    // Draw the boxes (...)

    if (node.hasChildren()) {
        Array<QuadTree<?>> children = node.getChildren(); // ERROR HERE
        for (QuadTree<?> child : children) {
            drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(child);
        }
    }
}

Because the type of objects stored inside the quadtree-structure is not relevant for this method, I use a wildcard for the method signature, so that this method can be applied to all kinds of QuadTree's.

The method getChildren() returns the four childs of the node, stored inside the collection-class called Array (implementation of Array). I am sure the return type of getChildren() is indeed Array<QuadTree<?>> (even Eclipse says so inside the tooltip), but I still get an error on this line, telling me:

cannot convert from Array<QuadTree<capture#6-of ?>> to Array<QuadTree<?>>

Here comes the fun part: When I ask Eclipse for suggestions how to solve this, this is one of the suggestions:

Change type of 'children' to 'Array<QuadTree<?>>'

But it already is of this type! It get's better: When I click on this suggestion, Eclipse changes this line to:

Array<?> children = node.getChildren();

Of course, this destroys all the following code.

What the heck is going on here? Could someone enlighten me, please?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is the method doesn't know it's the same QuadTree<?> (the ? could refer to different types in the same call).

The solution is to "type" the method, which locks in QuadTree<?> (and therefore ?) to be the same type throughout the method.

private <T extends QuadTree<?>> void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(T node) {
    if (node == null)
        return;

    Vector3 min = node.bbox.min;
    Vector3 max = node.bbox.max;
    // Draw the boxes (...)

    if (node.hasChildren()) {
        Array<T> children = node.getChildren(); // ERROR HERE
        for (T child : children) {
            drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(child);
        }
    }
}


? still means "anything", but it now the same "anything".

share|improve this answer
    
Makes perfect sense! Thank you! –  Christian Ciach Jul 6 '12 at 18:55
    
This is a really handy pattern to remember. Your generics confidence and understanding will improve every time you use it :) –  Bohemian Jul 6 '12 at 18:57
    
By the way, I prefer the style just posted by another guy, but he deleted his answer, because he was about 3 seconds slower than you. He suggested this method signature: private <T> void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(QuadTree<T> node) But you're both absolutely right. Thanks again! BTW, this was my first question on this website and it was answered in SECONDS! It's like magic, I am amazed by you guys. –  Christian Ciach Jul 6 '12 at 18:59
    
It depends on what you're trying to do. Both styles can work for you, but my preserves the possibility of QuadTree<?>, which may be required by the caller (not stated in question) –  Bohemian Jul 6 '12 at 19:04

If you do not care about type argument inside QuadTree simple remove everywhere from you code:) Just tried following code, compiler considers it as OK:

private void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(QuadTree node) {
    if (node == null)
        return;

    Vector3 min = node.bbox.min;
    Vector3 max = node.bbox.max;
    // Draw the boxes (...)

    if (node.hasChildren()) {
        Array<QuadTree> children = node.getChildren();
        for (QuadTree child : children) {
            drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(child);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this case Eclipse warns about using raw types. I had to use the @SuppressWarning annotation to get rid of the warning, but I don't want to do this. Also, I've read somewhere that Java may disallow the use of raw types sometime in the feature. Usually I wouldn't care, but this code is part of my Master Thesis and gets reviewed, so I want to maintain a clean style. Thanks anyway! –  Christian Ciach Jul 6 '12 at 19:09

In addition to Bohemian's answer, I want to point out that you can still have the same signature that you want (nobody needs to know that you are using this "T" type parameter, because it's an implementation detail.

You can do that by making a wrapper method, with the original type signature, that calls the generic method with T. The call works due to capture.

private void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper(QuadTree<?> node) {
    drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper_private(node);
}

private <T extends QuadTree<?>> void drawQuadtreeBoxes_helper_private(T node) {
    // code here ...
}

Of course, since the method in your example is private, you might not bother to do all this. But if it was a public API, it might be a good idea to do this, to abstract away the unnecessary implementation detail of the T.

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