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I am having a matrix [2,2][1,0].I need the nth multiflication of this 2*2 matrix.When I use simple multiplication ,I can do in O(n) or O(logn). O(logn) code :

int NUM(int n)
 {
  int F[2][2] = {{2,2},{1,0}};
  if(n == 0)
      return 0;
  power(F, n-1);
  return F[0][0];
 }

/* Optimized version of power() */
void power(int F[2][2], int n)
{
  if( n == 0 || n == 1)
  return;
  int M[2][2] = {{2,2},{1,0}};

 power(F, n/2);
  multiply(F, F);

 if( n%2 != 0 )
   multiply(F, M);
}

It works pretty fine with small value of n.But once if n is in order of 10^9 or more.int,long int even long long int won't work.So,I believe this method doesn't seem much of help.

Basically my problem is : the numbers get pretty big which doesnt even come in long long int.Then how could I deal with it.

Can anyone suggest me any formula or algorithm to get the nth power of 2*2 matrix[2,2][1,0]when n is of 10^9 ?

Thanks

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1  
Please clarify, are you running into performance issues (too slow) or overflow issues (numbers get too big and the results become incorrect)? I think the latter, in which case it's not the algorithm's fault, and you need to use some bignum library. –  Thomas Jul 6 '12 at 19:54
    
Numbers become pretty big.It doesnt come even in long long int.I amnt having problem with time complexity. –  vijay Jul 6 '12 at 19:56
    
Do you need an exact value, or only the value modulo some large number? –  templatetypedef Jul 6 '12 at 19:58
    
In that case, you need to use your language's bignum library (or a third-party one if your language doesn't have one). Based on your code I would say it is Java, so try Java's BigInteger library. The algorithm itself (a simple recursive square and multiply) looks fine. –  Thomas Jul 6 '12 at 19:58
2  
Is this homework, or just an exercise in implementation? Modulo is probably more convenient, basically you take your matrix modulo a number M after each power or multiply and the individual entries of the matrix will never grow beyond (M - 1)^2, but obviously the result will be an algorithm for modular exponentiation, thus different from what you have now. –  Thomas Jul 6 '12 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is this homework, or just an exercise in implementation? If you have the choice, modulo is probably more convenient, basically you take your matrix modulo a number M after each power or multiply and the individual entries of the matrix will never grow beyond (M - 1)^2, but obviously the result will be an algorithm for modular exponentiation, thus different from what you have now.

So for an unsigned long you can have a modulus up to 65535 or so, and an unlimited exponent. The process for taking a matrix modulo some number is simple: take each entry modulo that number.

Remember that such modular exponentiations will eventually enter a cycle anyway as the exponent increases (how big the cycle is depends on the matrix and on the properties of the modulus).

The code would look something like this (NOT tested and not particularly elegant, pretty much just insert matrix modulo's after each multiply):

/* Raises the matrix to the exponent n, modulo m. */
int NUM(int n, int m)
 {
  int F[2][2] = {{2,2},{1,0}};
  if(n == 0)
      return 0;
  power(F, n-1, m);
  return F[0][0];
 }

/* Takes a matrix modulo m. */
void modMatrix(int F[2][2], int m)
{
   F[0][0] = F[0][0] % m;
   F[0][1] = F[0][1] % m;
   F[1][0] = F[1][0] % m;
   F[1][1] = F[1][1] % m;
}

/* Optimized version of power() - raises a matrix F to the exponent n modulo modulus */
void power(int F[2][2], int n, int modulus)
{
  if( n == 0 || n == 1) return; // recursive termination condition

  int M[2][2] = {{2,2},{1,0}}; // original matrix for multiplication

 power(F, n/2, modulus); // raise the matrix to half the exponent
 modMatrix(multiply(F, F), modulus); // square the matrix to go the rest of the way

 if( n%2 != 0 ) modMatrix(multiply(F, M), modulus); // if the exponent is odd, multiply one last time
}
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If possible please include the modified code too. Thanks. –  vijay Jul 6 '12 at 20:36
    
I'm not sure it will be much use to you to just give you the code, but I have to give you the freedom to decide that for yourself, so here you go. The code is untested, but what's important is that you understand it. –  Thomas Jul 6 '12 at 20:49
    
Sorry, the code had a mistake in it, fixed now (that's what I get for writing code so late... or early... whatever) –  Thomas Jul 6 '12 at 21:14

Since it's a 2x2 matrix, a possible way to go is to expand it into the set of Pauli matrices and a unit matrix. Then use the properties of Pauli matrices (square is a unit matrix, etc -- see the linked page) to calculate the Nth power, which is not hard of a paper-and-pencil exercise (see equation (2) in the Wiki link above).

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