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I'm trying to figure out a way to squeeze spaces that are not in quotes (both double and single) in bash. I would use tr -s but it won't cut it. I would like to have the following line in a text file (foo.txt):

    "      not  squeezed      "     squeeze     this     part

turn into:

    "      not  squeezed      " squeeze this part

Of course it gets more complicated with nested single, double, escaped quotes so I wondering if there was some kind of command already written for this?

EDIT:

if I tried:

    cat foo.txt | tr -s 

I would get the output:

    " not squeezed " squeeze this part

which squeezes the spaces inside the quotes - which is undesirable

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What is this for? Is foo a command? –  robert Jul 6 '12 at 20:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you want is context sensitive, so you have to parse it yourself.

e.g.

cat foo.txt | (
st=0; lc=""; od -v -t o1  | cut -b 9- |
while read line
 do
  for t in $line
   do
    if [[ $st == 1 ]] ; then
     printf \\$t
    else
     if [[ "$t" != "040" ]] ; then
      printf \\$t
     else
      if [[ "$lc" != "040" ]] ; then
       printf \\$t
      fi
     fi
    fi
    if [[ "$t" == "042" ]] ; then
     st=$((1-$st))
    fi
    lc="$t"
   done
 done)
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Yes. It's called echo ... if you don't need the double quotes to be printed. If you do, first escape all unescaped " and all \ with \.

If this is not an option, you have to just cough up a small bash script that basically prints all its arguments, surrounded by " depending on previous arguments.

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I like this approach. I use echo all the time to squeeze stuff. It seems like the correct way to go, but I can't picture the actual code that solves this problem. Mind taking the time to write it up? –  Clayton Stanley Jul 8 '12 at 3:25

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