Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm certainly no CSS guru, but I am working on a problem where I'd like to make copying of images just slightly more burdensome for users. Sure, they can still easily be retrieved, but this makes it so you can't just drag/drop them on your desktop. Basically, I had a bunch of markup like this:

<img width="400" src="my image.png" class="foo" alt="foo">

Instead, I decided to put this into a background image and change the element to a div:

<div width="400" class="foo">

The problem I have is that the images have a fixed width, but a variable height. This worked excellent when I was using an img tag. It doesn't have the same behavior when I use a div tag. Instead, the CSS is requiring me to force a height property to display anything at all:

This doesn't work

.foo {
  display: block;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 400px;
  background-image: url(myimage.png);
  /* height: 200px; */
}

This sorta does:

.foo {
  display: block;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  width: 400px;
  background-image: url(myimage.png);
  height: 200px; 
}

The problem is the height for the images are all variable as I mentioned before. So it tiles over and over if I hard code a size. The container can be a placeholder for well over 5,000 images, so setting it by hand won't do it. If I can get this div to behave exactly like the img tag did, the problem is solved.

share|improve this question
    
Please don't do this. By putting the images in CSS background property you make them inaccessible to screen reader users. –  steveax Jul 6 '12 at 20:45
    
Sure, I'll try a different methodology. I still think that this getting voted down though is silly. It's not opinionated and is a sincere, technical question that should have a home on SO. –  randombits Jul 6 '12 at 21:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are just trying to prevent people from clicking and drag/dropping, I would say put each img into it's own div with position: relative. Add another div inside that relative div that has the following style:

div.img_box {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    background: none;
    z-index: 9999; /* or anything higher than your img's z-index */
}

That will cover up the image with a transparent div.

That way the image (which is part of your content) is still syntactically correct in the html.

Everybody is of course correct in saying that they have already downloaded the images to their computers just by visiting the site.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the best solution if you really want to prevent drag-and-drop, or even right-click+save. However, I agree with everyone that has mentioned that you can't stop your users from downloading the image. As long as it's being sent to the client, the user can retrieve it. Another point worth mentioning is that you should ensure the extra div's z-index is higher than that of the image's, and also that the div should be transparent. –  Zhihao Jul 6 '12 at 20:51
    
@Zhihao I figured I would just get him on the right track, but I fleshed it out a bit per your suggestions. Thanks. –  mayhewr Jul 6 '12 at 21:50
    
I only meant that as an aside, not a suggestion - your answer was good as it is. :) That being said, you bring up a good point in your answer - using image tags are also better for web semantics and are friendlier towards web crawlers and bots. –  Zhihao Jul 6 '12 at 21:54

If you're trying to prevent users from reusing your content easily, some good methods are to: 1. Use images with lower resolution to limit reuse potential 2. Watermark your images 3. A combination of both, in an image sprite.

Hacking at it will just be ugly, ineffective, and difficult to maintain.

share|improve this answer

You are just setting the background of the div, you aren't adding an image to the div. The div can be resized to whatever it won't resize to what it's background image is. Just use the tag.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay I understand what you're saying, but can you possibly give more insight into a solution I can use? –  randombits Jul 6 '12 at 20:35
1  
The point is to use the img tag like you were doing when it worked perfectly. You aren't going to stop users from "stealing images" that you put on the internet. Hell they can just pull them right out of their cache directory. –  Triton Man Jul 6 '12 at 20:39

The only thing you could do with CSS is add a height which would work for all images. So if you're images range from 200-250px in height, set the div to 250px. Otherwise, you'll need javascript or server-side scripting to determine the height of the image and set the the CSS.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.