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I am coding a c project, that needs that the user enters a N*N square of integers : that's to say an input of N lines of N integers. The algo works fine.

Now I want the user to input N lines of N integers each of consecutive integers are separated by a space. Here, I don't have the right usage of scanf, because I tried to declare integers array but I was not able to deal with the spacing.

I tried something like this, very unnatural and failing :

int i=0;
int j=0;

int N;
scanf("%d",&N);

char c[N][2*N-1];

while(i < N){
    scanf("%s",&c[i]);
    i++;
}

i=0;
j=0;
while (i<N){
    while (j<N){
        c[i][j]=c[i][2*j]-48;
        j++;
    }
    j=0;
    i++;
}

Can someone help ?

Best, Newben

share|improve this question
8  
You might want to work on your acceptance rate, it may encourage more answers .. just a friendly suggestion that hopefully will help. –  Levon Jul 6 '12 at 20:47
    
Ok, thanks for the advice ! –  Newben Jul 6 '12 at 20:49
    
If you need a "square", why is your array declared as a "rectangle"? Where did 2*N-1 as the second dimension come from? –  AndreyT Jul 6 '12 at 20:53
    
Style is important. In future, please try to keep it tidier. –  Wug Jul 6 '12 at 21:02
    
Because at the n-th input, the user jumps to line so press the enter key –  Newben Jul 6 '12 at 21:03
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I understood what your original code was supposed to do then this code should actually do it (and print it out again just to prove it worked).

You need to dynamically allocate the array since it's variable size ( In C99 you could use variable sized arrays on the stack but that's really a different discussion ).

scanf will automatically ignore white-space between the integers (including spaces and new-lines) so you don't need to parse that out manually.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i=0, j=0, N;
    int **c;

    scanf("%d",&N);

    c = malloc(N*sizeof(int*));

    for (i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
        c[i] = malloc(N*sizeof(int));
        for (j=0;j<N;j++)
        {
            scanf("%d",&c[i][j]);
        }
    }

    for (i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
        for (j=0;j<N;j++)
        {
            printf("%d ",c[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
        free(c[i]);
    }
    free(c);
    return 0;
 }  

C99 alternative without malloc/free for completeness (I'v never liked this C99 feature since there's no way to check that the was/is enough space on the stack):

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i=0, j=0, N;

    scanf("%d",&N);

    int c[N][N];

    for (i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
        for (j=0;j<N;j++)
        {
            scanf("%d",&c[i][j]);
        }
    }

    for (i=0;i<N;i++)
    {
        for (j=0;j<N;j++)
        {
            printf("%d ",c[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
 }  
share|improve this answer
    
I can't really judge because my compier doesn't support malloc and free... –  Newben Jul 6 '12 at 21:09
2  
@Newben What C compiler doesn't support malloc() and free()? Are you doing #include stdlib.h> What happens or how do you know it doesn't support these two functions? –  Levon Jul 6 '12 at 21:11
    
Yes I did, but I have numbers of error –  Newben Jul 6 '12 at 21:12
1  
What erros do you get if you try to compile my code? –  Pete Fordham Jul 6 '12 at 21:15
2  
I'm honestly not trying to be in any way offensive, but if you not familiar with dynamic memory allocation or pointers you should read a book on programming in C before you post here again. –  Pete Fordham Jul 6 '12 at 21:26
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