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Is there any commonly used (or unjustly uncommonly used) utility "library" of bash functions? Something like Apache commons-lang for Java. Bash is so ubiquitous that it seems oddly neglected in the area of extension libraries.

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ramon what is the reason you didnt upvote and didnt accept the answer below? –  Yuck Jul 6 '12 at 22:09
    
It's not exactly what I was looking for, I'm still holding out hope someone might come up with an example of a library for general shell scripts. If nobody does then I'll accept the answer based on the update at the end about redhat's init script library. –  Ramon Jul 6 '12 at 22:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Libraries for bash are out there, but not common. One of the reasons that bash libraries are scarce is due to the limitation of functions. I believe these limitations are best explained on "Greg's Bash Wiki":

Functions. Bash's "functions" have several issues:

  • Code reusability: Bash functions don't return anything; they only produce output streams. Every reasonable method of capturing that stream and either assigning it to a variable or passing it as an argument requires a SubShell, which breaks all assignments to outer scopes. (See also BashFAQ/084 for tricks to retrieve results from a function.) Thus, libraries of reusable functions are not feasible, as you can't ask a function to store its results in a variable whose name is passed as an argument (except by performing eval backflips).

  • Scope: Bash has a simple system of local scope which roughly resembles "dynamic scope" (e.g. Javascript, elisp). Functions see the locals of their callers (like Python's "nonlocal" keyword), but can't access a caller's positional parameters (except through BASH_ARGV if extdebug is enabled). Reusable functions can't be guaranteed free of namespace collisions unless you resort to weird naming rules to make conflicts sufficiently unlikely. This is particularly a problem if implementing functions that expect to be acting upon variable names from frame n-3 which may have been overwritten by your reusable function at n-2. Ksh93 can use the more common lexical scope rules by declaring functions with the "function name { ... }" syntax (Bash can't, but supports this syntax anyway).

  • Closures: In Bash, functions themselves are always global (have "file scope"), so no closures. Function definitions may be nested, but these are not closures, though they look very much the same. Functions are not "passable" (first-class), and there are no anonymous functions (lambdas). In fact, nothing is "passable", especially not arrays. Bash uses strictly call-by-value semantics (magic alias hack excepted).

  • There are many more complications involving: subshells; exported functions; "function collapsing" (functions that define or redefine other functions or themselves); traps (and their inheritance); and the way functions interact with stdio. Don't bite the newbie for not understanding all this. Shell functions are totally f***ed.

Source: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashWeaknesses

One example of a shell "library" is /etc/rc.d/functions on Redhat based system. This file contains functions commonly used in sysV init script.

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while this is awesome information, it does not answer the question at all –  Yuck Jul 6 '12 at 21:43
2  
I wouldn't say "at all". The first sentence directly answers the question, although it is vague. –  jordanm Jul 6 '12 at 21:48
    
cool thank you for the edit –  Yuck Jul 6 '12 at 21:50
    
+1 Nice answer. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 7 '12 at 2:18
    
This answer is quite vexxing. Functions can be treated as command scripts defined in a centralized file which is very useful. All of the bullet points are quite easily addressed: namely $(namespaced_func). Probably a majority of languages do not encourage assignment of variables by value. There is also the paradigm of avoiding functional side effects. In addition, you can assign to global variables which accomplishes assignment by value for all intensive purposes. I think it would be productive to delete this answer and focus on evaluating function libraries –  MetaChrome Nov 17 '13 at 20:50

I found a good but old article here that gave a comprehensive list of utility libraries:

http://dberkholz.com/2011/04/07/bash-shell-scripting-libraries/

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Variables declared inside a function but without the local keyword are global.

It's good practice to declare variables only needed inside a function with local to avoid conflicts with other functions and globally (see foo() below).

Bash function libraries need to always be 'sourced'. I prefer using the 'source' synonym instead of the more common dot(.) so I can see it better during debugging.

The following technique works in at least bash 3.00.16 and 4.1.5...

#!/bin/bash
#
# TECHNIQUES
#

source ./TECHNIQUES.source

echo
echo "Send user prompts inside a function to stderr..."
foo() {
    echo "  Function foo()..."              >&2 # send user prompts to stderr
    echo "    Echoing 'this is my data'..." >&2 # send user prompts to stderr
    echo "this is my data"                      # this will not be displayed yet
}
#
fnRESULT=$(foo)                       # prints: Function foo()...
echo "  foo() returned '$fnRESULT'"   # prints: foo() returned 'this is my data'

echo
echo "Passing global and local variables..."
#
GLOBALVAR="Reusing result of foo() which is '$fnRESULT'"
echo "  Outside function: GLOBALVAR=$GLOBALVAR"
#
function fn()
{
  local LOCALVAR="declared inside fn() with 'local' keyword is only visible in fn()"
  GLOBALinFN="declared inside fn() without 'local' keyword is visible globally"
  echo
  echo "  Inside function fn()..."
  echo "    GLOBALVAR=$GLOBALVAR"
  echo "    LOCALVAR=$LOCALVAR"
  echo "    GLOBALinFN=$GLOBALinFN"
}

# call fn()...
fn

# call fnX()...
fnX

echo
echo "  Outside function..."
echo "    GLOBALVAR=$GLOBALVAR"
echo
echo "    LOCALVAR=$LOCALVAR"
echo "    GLOBALinFN=$GLOBALinFN"
echo
echo "    LOCALVARx=$LOCALVARx"
echo "    GLOBALinFNx=$GLOBALinFNx"
echo

The sourced function library is represented by...

#!/bin/bash
#
# TECHNIQUES.source
#

function fnX()
{
  local LOCALVARx="declared inside fnX() with 'local' keyword is only visible in fnX()"
  GLOBALinFNx="declared inside fnX() without 'local' keyword is visible globally"
  echo
  echo "  Inside function fnX()..."
  echo "    GLOBALVAR=$GLOBALVAR"
  echo "    LOCALVARx=$LOCALVARx"
  echo "    GLOBALinFNx=$GLOBALinFNx"
}

Running TECHNIQUES produces the following output...

Send user prompts inside a function to stderr...
  Function foo()...
    Echoing 'this is my data'...
  foo() returned 'this is my data'

Passing global and local variables...
  Outside function: GLOBALVAR=Reusing result of foo() which is 'this is my data'

  Inside function fn()...
    GLOBALVAR=Reusing result of foo() which is 'this is my data'
    LOCALVAR=declared inside fn() with 'local' keyword is only visible in fn()
    GLOBALinFN=declared inside fn() without 'local' keyword is visible globally

  Inside function fnX()...
    GLOBALVAR=Reusing result of foo() which is 'this is my data'
    LOCALVARx=declared inside fnX() with 'local' keyword is only visible in fnX()
    GLOBALinFNx=declared inside fnX() without 'local' keyword is visible globally

  Outside function...
    GLOBALVAR=Reusing result of foo() which is 'this is my data'

    LOCALVAR=
    GLOBALinFN=declared inside fn() without 'local' keyword is visible globally

    LOCALVARx=
    GLOBALinFNx=declared inside fnX() without 'local' keyword is visible globally
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