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I was trying to return an error to the call to the controller as advised in This link so that client can take appropriate action. The controller is called by javascript via jquery AJAX. I am getting the Json object back only if I don't set the status to error. Here is the sample code

if (response.errors.Length > 0)
            Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest;
return Json(response);

I get the Json if I don't set the statuscode. If I set the status code I get the status code back but not the Json error object.

Update I want to send an Error object as JSON so that it can be handled error callback of ajax.

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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I found the solution here

I had to create a action filter to override the default behaviour of MVC

Here is my exception class

class ValidationException : ApplicationException
{
    public JsonResult exceptionDetails;
    public ValidationException(JsonResult exceptionDetails)
    {
        this.exceptionDetails = exceptionDetails;
    }
    public ValidationException(string message) : base(message) { }
    public ValidationException(string message, Exception inner) : base(message, inner) { }
    protected ValidationException(
    System.Runtime.Serialization.SerializationInfo info,
    System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext context)
        : base(info, context) { }
}

Note that I have constructor which initializes my JSON. Here is the action filter

public class HandleUIExceptionAttribute : FilterAttribute, IExceptionFilter
{
    public virtual void OnException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
        }
        if (filterContext.Exception != null)
        {
            filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Clear();
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;
            filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)System.Net.HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError;
            filterContext.Result = ((ValidationException)filterContext.Exception).myJsonError;
        }
    }

Now that I have the action filter, I will decorate my controller with the filter attribute

[HandleUIException]
public JsonResult UpdateName(string objectToUpdate)
{
   var response = myClient.ValidateObject(objectToUpdate);
   if (response.errors.Length > 0)
     throw new ValidationException(Json(response));
}

When the error is thrown the action filter which implements IExceptionFilter get called and I get back the Json on the client on error callback.

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2  
In case the reader is thinking "Is all that necessary?", the answer is "no". - I was in the same situation as @Sarath and wanted to return a HTTP error code and some JSON data that described the error. It turned out I could just use the lines where the response was cleared, IIS custom errors are skipped and the status code is sat. I put those 3 lines in my Action on my Controller, and after those 3 lines, I just returned my JSON data as normal. Worked like a charm. –  René Feb 10 '13 at 16:17
1  
Indeed that's true, but to be reusable you would want to do it as the answer indicates rather than copy/past the same code into each action. –  Hades Jun 6 '13 at 15:35
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You have to return JSON error object yourself after setting the StatusCode, like so ...

if (BadRequest)
{
    Dictionary<string, object> error = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    error.Add("ErrorCode", -1);
    error.Add("ErrorMessage", "Something really bad happened");
    return Json(error);
}

Another way is to have a JsonErrorModel and populate it

public class JsonErrorModel
{
    public int ErrorCode { get; set;}

    public string ErrorMessage { get; set; }
}

public ActionResult SomeMethod()
{

    if (BadRequest)
    {
        var error = new JsonErrorModel
        {
            ErrorCode = -1,
            ErrorMessage = "Something really bad happened"
        };

        return Json(error);
    }

   //Return valid response
}

Take a look at the answer here as well

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1  
I already have the error in response object. The issue is that I get "Bad Request" and not the JSON object. If I don't set the status I get the JSON with errors but client does not know that it is an exception condition. –  Sarath Jul 6 '12 at 22:50
    
@Sarath Check the link in the answer. You need to use the error attribute of the ajax method in JQuery –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 7 '12 at 14:55
    
the problem I am facing is that on the response I am not getting the JSON back if I set the status. The answer you pointed is what exactly I am doing. The problem being if I set response status I do not get the JSON. –  Sarath Jul 7 '12 at 19:48
    
Weird well you might just want to set the error code in the JSON response to the http error code and then check it on the client. Don't set the error code on the server side. I will update my answer to reflect the solution –  Stefan Bossbaly Jul 7 '12 at 23:23
    
I want this to call the error call back. –  Sarath Jul 9 '12 at 21:50
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There is a very elegant solution to this problem, just configure your site via web.config:

<system.webServer>
    <httpErrors errorMode="DetailedLocalOnly" existingResponse="PassThrough"/>
</system.webServer>

Source: http://serverfault.com/questions/123729/iis-is-overriding-my-response-content-if-i-manually-set-the-response-statuscode

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And if your needs aren't as complex as Sarath's you can get away with something even simpler:

    [MyError]
    public JsonResult Error(string objectToUpdate)
    {
      throw new Exception("ERROR!");
    }

    public class MyErrorAttribute : FilterAttribute, IExceptionFilter
    {
        public virtual void OnException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
        {
            if (filterContext == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("filterContext");
            }
            if (filterContext.Exception != null)
            {
                filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Clear();
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.TrySkipIisCustomErrors = true;
                filterContext.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode = (int)System.Net.HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError;
                filterContext.Result = new JsonResult() { Data = filterContext.Exception.Message };
            }
        }
    }
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You need to decide if you want "HTTP level error" (that what error codes are for) or "application level error" (that what your custom JSON response is for).

Most high level objects using HTTP will never look into response stream if error code set to something that is not 2xx (success range). In your case you are explicitly setting error code to failure (I think 403 or 500) and force XMLHttp object to ignore body of the response.

To fix - either handle error conditions on client side or not set error code and return JSON with error information (see Sbossb reply for details).

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Thanks for ur response. How will the client know that there was an exception it I don't set the status code? –  Sarath Jul 6 '12 at 22:47
    
@Sarath, The same check response.errors && response.errors.length > 0 as you are doing now on server side (assuming JavaScript client). –  Alexei Levenkov Jul 6 '12 at 22:51
    
@Alexi Yes. But I would like to implicitly inform the client that an error has occurred. That is to say I would like to handle this condition on failure callback of ajax call instead of success callback and then look for errors.length. –  Sarath Jul 6 '12 at 23:00
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