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I'm developing a program which generates certain parts of it as c/c++ libraries. E.g. it creates directories - lib1, lib2, .. , libN. For each library it generates c/c++ code + Makefile, then it uses gcc/g++ + ld and finally it calls the code from libraries. Now the problem is that if lib1 has a function fun and libN as well, when calling fun from libN, lib1 is used. I've tried different versions of gcc/g++ up to v4.7.

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Now the problem is that if lib1 has a function fun and libN as well, when calling fun from libN, lib1 is used.

Presumably you are talking about shared libraries, and not archive libraries (where you'd get a multiply-defined symbol error).

Yes, that is how it is supposed to work, and has always worked on UNIX. Caching has nothing to do with it.

If you are on ELF platform, you might be able to make it work more Windows-like by using -Wl,-Bsymbolic, but you'll be fighting the default system behavior, and should expect rough ride, and lots of unexpected gotcha's. If the fun doesn't need to be exposed from libX, hidden symbol visibility is your friend.

Since you are generating the code for lib1, ... libN, it might be easier to simply avoid name collision by using e.g. libX_fun instead of fun. This would also be much more portable, as it will just work everywhere.

Update:

function name has really to be fun according to the interface specifications.

According to who's interface specifications?

You obviously control both the main program, and the libraries. So you can, and likely should change the interface specification to avoid this problem.

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The function name has really to be fun according to the interface specifications. –  nil Jul 8 '12 at 10:04
    
-Wl,-Bsymbolic didn't help. However, I solved the problem using dlclose right after libX finishes its job. This won't work though if I want to use lib1, .. , libN in parallel. –  nil Jul 8 '12 at 10:10
    
There is a precompiled MATLAB-code which calls fun, it would be too costly to recompile it in runtime. –  nil Jul 9 '12 at 0:00

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