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I am completely new to JAVA. I am writing a wrapper-library in JAVA to make some functions available in Basic-like language.

I got stock at a certain point when I noted that some code were not executed in the JAVA-library although the compiler did not complain (using Eclipse). I resolved it finally by replacing the code as follows:

public void VideoQuality(int vQuality) //did not work 

into

public boolean VideoQuality(int vQuality) //works

Here are the complete code-snippets:

 public void VideoQuality(int vQuality) //did not work
        {if (vQuality==16) {
            vidQuality=16;
            }
            else if (vQuality==-16)  {
                vidQuality=-16;
            }
            else if (vQuality==0)  {
                vidQuality=0;
            }
            else
                vidQuality=-16;
        vitamioExt.setVideoQuality(vidQuality);
         }  

public boolean VideoQuality(int vQuality) //works
        {if (vQuality==16) {
            vidQuality=16;
            }
            else if (vQuality==-16)  {
                vidQuality=-16;
            }
            else if (vQuality==0)  {
                vidQuality=0;
            }
            else
                vidQuality=-16;
        vitamioExt.setVideoQuality(vidQuality);
        return true;
          }  

I think void corresponds to a sub in Visual Basic while boolean corresponds to a function.

I found it odd however that the following code worked using void

public void setVolume(float leftVolume,float rightVolume)
      {
          vitamioExt.setVolume(leftVolume, rightVolume);
      }

I am surely missing something very obvious but I can't see why the void-code would not work while the boolean-code worked.

Maybe it depends how I call the code?

Anyone who can shed some lights?

EDIT: to clarify what was not working, I meant that the code:

vitamioExt.setVideoQuality(vidQuality);

did not execute in the void-snippet.

EDIT2: vidQuality was declared in a different part of the code. I just posted the snippets since the problems were with those and variables were all functioning.

EDIT3: At the end, I guess I must have called the void-snippet erroneously although the compiler did not compile. In either case, both snippets should execute although of course the void-snippet would be the right one to use since I did not expect a return-value.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Chris Dennett, Luiggi Mendoza, DNA, T.J. Crowder, Anthony Pegram Jul 6 '12 at 23:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I don't think it is possible to define two methods with the same signature and different return types in Java. The compiler should have failed in that line, provided that both methods are defined in the same class. This is not evident in your code. –  Edwin Dalorzo Jul 6 '12 at 22:11
3  
@moster67, it would be good for you to read an introductory Java book or tutorial first, perhaps the official Java Tutorial which should be available for download from Oracle. People can answer this question for you, but if you haven't learned basics like this, you will find it hard to make anything work in Java. It would be more efficient to just read the tutorial first before you start programming. –  Alex D Jul 6 '12 at 22:12
    
-1 because "did not work" is "not sufficient". –  user166390 Jul 6 '12 at 22:12
    
What is a void? Nothing...therefore returning void means there is no return for the method. If its a boolean, a boolean value is returned from that function. –  Brendan Jul 6 '12 at 22:12
3  
Explain "did not work." What happened? What did you expect to happen? Why do you think it should have been the way you thought, rather than the way it was? –  T.J. Crowder Jul 6 '12 at 22:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The only difference between

public void VideoQuality(int vQuality)

and

public boolean VideoQuality(int vQuality)

is that the former doesn't return a value, and the latter does (specifically, a boolean value). That's the full extent of the difference.

That means, for instance, that with the void version of VideoQuality:

boolean x = VideoQuality(10); // Will not compile
VideoQuality(10);             // Will compile

...because you can't assign the result of a void function to a variable.

If you used the boolean version of VideoQuality:

boolean x = VideoQuality(10); // Will compile
VideoQuality(10);             // Will compile

...because although you can assign the result of a function that returns boolean to a boolean variable, you don't have to. You can ignore the return value if you like. (Usually that's not good practice, but sometimes it's okay.)

I think void corresponds to a sub in Visual Basic while boolean corresponds to a function.

Loosely speaking, yes. void indicates that the function has no return value, like Sub in VB. Anything else (boolean, int, Foo, whatever) indicates that A) The function has a return value, and B) It is of the given type. So that's like Function in VB.

share|improve this answer
    
good explanation. After all, it is basic for most programming languages. I guess I must somehow called the void-snippet wrongly although it seems odd because the compiler should have complained if I used a wrong syntax. Anyway thanks! –  moster67 Jul 6 '12 at 22:41
    
@monster if you feel this answered your question, and solved your problem, you're encouraged to 'accept' it as your answer. –  corsiKa Jul 6 '12 at 22:47
    
@corsiKa: moster67 if I may - not monster! Just kidding. I know very well that I should accept an answer. I still have't made my mind up yet. I left some comments and maybe there were will be further comments? However, please be sure that I will accept one of the replies I got. –  moster67 Jul 6 '12 at 22:52

Functions are declared with a type, much like regular variables, but a function's declared type is called its return type, which says "this function will return as a boolean when called." For example:

boolean alive = true;
boolean isDogAlive() {
    return alive;
}

If this function is called, it will return true, so you could say

if (! isDogAlive()) { // if it returns false
    System.out.println("Oh no!");
} else {
    System.out.println("Yay!");
}

Functions are declared void if they don't return anything. You shouldn't need to give a method a boolean return type unless you actually need to get the true/false value. Void should work fine for your situation.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, so looking at the code-snippets I provided, both should actually work and execute the line "vitamioExt.setVideoQuality(vidQuality);". Of course, in this case the void-method is the one I should use since I am not interested in a return-value like happens in the boolean(function)-code. I guess as this point, I must have called the void-version erroneously and that's why it never executed. –  moster67 Jul 6 '12 at 22:38

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