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Similar to this question but I don't care so much about what characters will/won't cause the error to fire. I'm more curious as to what method I can call, to check for myself, if the current string will fire the above error message.

To give a bit of background, I'm creating random passwords when a user forgets theirs and needs a reset. Unfortunately, the random password generator "accidentally" created one with &# in it recently. This caused the page to break when the user tried to login with it.

As mentioned in plenty of posts around this topic, ValidateRequest=false (or <httpRuntime requestValidationMode="2.0" /> for .NET 4.0) can be used to turn off .NET checking for these exploits, but I don't see any reason to lose this extra layer of security when I'm the one creating the string in the first place. And simply telling the random generator to re-randomize on an incomplete list (<, &#, etc) doesn't seem like the cleanest solution so I'd like to use the same method of checking that .NET is using.

Microsoft's explanation of what exploits are in question and what is being done to guard against them here.

This guy talks about finding a function called IsDangerousString after digging in with Reflector, but I'm not able to find this function to use it. Also he's referring to .NET 1.1 and I'm working with .NET 3.5

share|improve this question
    
Interesting question, but I don't see a reason why you would include such obscure characters. I'd probably use the RandomNumberGenerator class to fill a byte[] and then use a z-base32 encoder to encode the bytes to a string. – Shelakel Jul 6 '12 at 22:33
2  
you know the "exploit" character you want to allow why not Html Encode them before post and then html decode them back – HatSoft Jul 6 '12 at 22:35
    
@Shelakel Sure, there are plenty of other ways to generate random passwords. Unfortunately, however, we are stuck needing to fulfill all 4 of the 4 character rules (lowercase, uppercase, number, special char) with passwords for this project. Of course, I could just remove the offending "obscure" characters, but since the spec isn't very clear I'd like to use the same function the system is to check. – Mercurybullet Jul 6 '12 at 23:39
    
@HatSoft valid point, though this sounds like extra overhead when I could just be more careful about the string I send to the user in the first place. – Mercurybullet Jul 6 '12 at 23:44
    
@Mercurybullet I suggest replace the characters with new ones. – Nudier Mena Jul 7 '12 at 2:41
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The ASP.NET class that validates requests is System.Web.CrossSiteScriptingValidation, and the method you want is IsDangerousString. Unfortunately, both are marked internal, so you can't access them directly. You have several options:

Option 1: Call IsDangerousString via Reflection. However, Microsoft could change the method at any time, which would break your applicaton.

Option 2: Decompile IsDangerousString and copy it to your own application. See the code below.

Option 3: Call Membership.GeneratePassword. This returns a password that is guaranteed to pass request validation.

Excerpts from the ASP.NET CrossSiteScriptingValidation class (via .NET Reflector):

private static char[] startingChars = new char[] { '<', '&' };

internal static bool IsDangerousString(string s, out int matchIndex)
{
    matchIndex = 0;
    int startIndex = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        int num2 = s.IndexOfAny(startingChars, startIndex);
        if (num2 < 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (num2 == (s.Length - 1))
        {
            return false;
        }
        matchIndex = num2;
        char ch = s[num2];
        if (ch != '&')
        {
            if ((ch == '<') && ((IsAtoZ(s[num2 + 1]) || (s[num2 + 1] == '!')) || ((s[num2 + 1] == '/') || (s[num2 + 1] == '?'))))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        else if (s[num2 + 1] == '#')
        {
            return true;
        }
        startIndex = num2 + 1;
    }
}

private static bool IsAtoZ(char c)
{
    return (((c >= 'a') && (c <= 'z')) || ((c >= 'A') && (c <= 'Z')));
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for the info. Since the function is internal and I won't be able to access it directly for updates, is there any reason not to just use the following regex (with ignoreCase)? \<[a-z!/?]|&# – Mercurybullet Jul 9 '12 at 17:54
    
The regex is equivalent to Option 2, only much more concise. :-) This is probably the best you can do for now. In the next version of ASP.NET, though, you'll be able to skip validation for certain fields by using the HttpRequest.Unvalidated property. – Michael Liu Jul 9 '12 at 18:52

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