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I'm building a system in which there are the following tables:

  • Song
  • Broadcast
  • Station
  • Follow
  • User

A user follows stations, which have songs on them through broadcasts.

I'm building a "feed" of songs for a user based on the stations they follow.

Here's the query:

SELECT DISTINCT ON ("broadcasts"."created_at", "songs"."id") songs.*
FROM "songs"
INNER JOIN "broadcasts" ON "songs"."shared_id" = "broadcasts"."song_id"
INNER JOIN "stations" ON "broadcasts"."station_id" = "stations"."id"
INNER JOIN "follows" ON "stations"."id" = "follows"."station_id"
WHERE "follows"."user_id" = 2
ORDER BY broadcasts.created_at desc
LIMIT 18

As you can see here, I'm getting duplicate songs which is happening because I'm following two stations that BOTH have broadcasted that same song:

sql not working distinct on join

Note: shared_id is the same as id.

My question is: How do I modify this query so it will return only unique songs based on their id (or shared_id)?

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What happens if you return "broadcasts"."created_at" in the SELECT? –  andy holaday Jul 6 '12 at 23:27
    
No change, I just get that value returned as well. –  Nathan Wienert Jul 6 '12 at 23:49
    
Sorry I should have added to my first comment: Is the returned created_at unique on every row? –  andy holaday Jul 6 '12 at 23:51
    
Yea it is, I only have it in the distinct because I am using it in in the order, but its not a problem as its pretty much (totally?) impossible for two songs to have the same exact time anyway. –  Nathan Wienert Jul 7 '12 at 0:35
    
That's exactly the issue. You're selecting distinct on a field that is pretty much guaranteed to be unique. You should probably remove that from the distinct clause. –  Jaime Torres Jul 7 '12 at 0:42
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remove "broadcasts"."created_at" from the DISTINCT predicate because it is returning non-unique values, hence duplicate songs. If you need to use this information to sort please create a new question.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was actually the point of my question but I've posted a revised question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/11371656/… –  Nathan Wienert Jul 7 '12 at 1:52
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