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So basically I'm reading this book. I'm using gcc, and when ever I compile my code it will always print 1.

int x = 5, y = 3;
printf("%d", x > 3);

The result will ALWAYS be 1. Even if I did:

int i = 3, j = 4, k = 5;
printf("%d", i % j + i < k);

Can someone explain what I'm doing wrong?

EDIT: If I do a

 int i = 10, j = 1;
 printf("%d", i > j ? i : j);

That WILL print out 10.

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closed as too localized by Anthony Pegram, alf, Praetorian, AnT, Zeta Jul 6 '12 at 23:23

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I think you've got a dangling " in your first printf there. –  TheZ Jul 6 '12 at 23:12
    
Sorry, that was a mistake. It still prints out one though. –  shix Jul 6 '12 at 23:13
    
If I'm not wrong the second have to print 1 because is: 3 % 7 < 5 which is TRUE (and so 1) because 3 % 7 = 3 which is less than 5 –  Aurelio De Rosa Jul 6 '12 at 23:15
    
@AurelioDeRosa % has higher precedence than +, so it's (3 % 4) + 3 < 5. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 6 '12 at 23:16
1  
Yeah first prints 0. Its a basic comparison returning true/false. No weird results. –  abhshkdz Jul 6 '12 at 23:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because you're doing a comparison, and those comparisons are true, which is 1 in decimal. (0 being false).

HTH

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3  
@shix What about it? Are you trolling? i is greater than j, so the expression i > j ? i : j returns i, which is 10. –  Praetorian Jul 6 '12 at 23:21
2  
@Prætorian Never suspected there'd be trolling on SO. A whole new set of possibilities.... –  Eitan T Jul 6 '12 at 23:22
3  
@shix because ? : is the ternary operator, and it returns either i or j, depending whether the statement i > j is true or false. In this case it's true, so it returns i. –  Eitan T Jul 6 '12 at 23:24
1  
the first two print out "comparisons", the second one an "expression". The first comparisons are 'true' the expression is evaluated to '10'. –  omarrr Jul 6 '12 at 23:24
1  
@shix I explained why the last one prints 10, the first 2 are logical comparisons which evaluate to integers that have the value 1 if the comparison is true and 0 if it is false. You really need to read a C book. –  Praetorian Jul 6 '12 at 23:25

I suspect the comparative operator "x > 3" gets evaluated to True, which is 1 in integer from from the cast "%d" in your printf. If you tried "x < 3", you would get a result of 0.

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