Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is by far the slowest query in my web application.

SELECT prof.user_id                      AS userId,
       prof.first_name                   AS first,
       prof.last_name                    AS last,
       prof.birthdate,
       prof.class_string                 AS classes,
       prof.city,
       prof.country,
       prof.state,
       prof.images,
       prof.videos,
       u.username,
       u.avatar,
       (SELECT Count(*)
        FROM   company_member_sponsorship
        WHERE  member_id = prof.user_id
               AND status = 'sponsored') AS sponsor_count,
       (SELECT Count(*)
        FROM   member_schedules
        WHERE  user_id = prof.user_id)   AS sched_count
FROM   member_profiles prof
       LEFT JOIN users u
              ON u.id = prof.user_id
ORDER  BY ( prof.images + prof.videos * 5 + (
            CASE
              WHEN prof.expire_date > :time THEN 50
              ELSE 0
            end ) + sponsor_count * 20 + sched_count * 4
          ) DESC,
          prof.last_name ASC
LIMIT  :start, :records  

Everything else on the site takes less than a second to load even with lots of queries happening on all levels. This one takes about 3-4 seconds.

It's obviously the table scans that are causing the slowdown. I can understand why; the first table has 50,000+ rows, the second 160,000+ rows.

Is there any way I can optimize this query to make it go faster?

If worse comes to worst I can always go through my code and maintain a tally for sponsorships and events in the profile table like I do for images and videos though I'd like to avoid it.

EDIT: I added the results of an EXPLAIN on the query.

id  select_type         table                       type    possible_keys   key         key_len ref                         rows    Extra
1   PRIMARY             prof                        ALL     NULL            NULL        NULL    NULL                        44377   Using temporary; Using filesort
1   PRIMARY             u                           eq_ref  PRIMARY         PRIMARY     3       mxsponsor.prof.user_id      1   
3   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  member_schedules            ref     user_id         user_id     3       mxsponsor.prof.user_id      6       Using index
2   DEPENDENT SUBQUERY  company_member_sponsorship  ref     member_id       member_id   3       mxsponsor.prof.user_id      2       Using where; Using index

EDIT2:

I ended up dealing with the problem by maintaining a count in the member profile. Wherever sponsorships/events are added/deleted I just invoke a function that scans the sponsorship/events table and updates the count for that member. There might still be a way to optimize a query like this, but we're publishing this site rather soon so I'm going with the quick and dirty solution for now.

share|improve this question
4  
Really need to see your schema with indexes if not an EXPLAIN... –  prodigitalson Jul 7 '12 at 0:53
    
You may get better response if you post it in dba.stackexchange.com/?as=1 –  Emmad Kareem Jul 7 '12 at 1:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not guaranteed to work, but try using join and group by rather than inner selects:

SELECT prof.user_id      AS userId,
       prof.first_name   AS first,
       prof.last_name    AS last,
       prof.birthdate,
       prof.class_string AS classes,
       prof.city,
       prof.country,
       prof.state,
       prof.images,
       prof.videos,
       u.username,
       u.avatar,
       Count(cms.id)     AS sponsor_count,
       Count(ms.id)      AS sched_count
FROM   member_profiles prof
       LEFT JOIN users u
              ON u.id = prof.user_id
       LEFT JOIN company_member_sponsorship cms
              ON cms.member_id = prof.user_id
                 AND cms.status = 'sponsored'
       LEFT JOIN member_schedules ms
              ON ms.user_id = prof.user_id
GROUP  BY u.id
ORDER  BY ( prof.images + prof.videos * 5 + (
            CASE
              WHEN prof.expire_date > :time THEN 50
              ELSE 0
            end ) + sponsor_count * 20 + sched_count * 4
          ) DESC,
          prof.last_name ASC
LIMIT  :start, :records  

If that's not any better, a explain of that query would help.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your suggestion. I tried the query and it took about 5 times longer than the original one... weird. I always heard that joining was better than subqueries, too. –  Peronix Jul 9 '12 at 20:59
    
@Peronix show me the explain from that query and I might be able to help more. It sounds like an index issue. –  Petah Jul 9 '12 at 21:19
    
-id|select_type|table|type|possible_keys|key|key_len|ref|rows|Extra- -1|SIMPLE|prof|ALL|NULL NULL|NULL|NULL|44377|Using temporary; Using filesort- -1|SIMPLE|u|eq_ref|PRIMARY|PRIMARY|3|mxsponsor.prof.user_id|1- -1|SIMPLE|cms|ref|member_id|member_id|3|mxsponsor.prof.user_id|4|Using where; Using index- -1|SIMPLE|ms|ref|user_id|user_id|3|mxsponsor.prof.user_id|3|Using index- –  Peronix Jul 10 '12 at 18:42
    
So its seems to be your order by thats causing the problem, you you probably need to simplify it, or denormalize the table structure. –  Petah Jul 10 '12 at 21:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.