Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
View the source of an R package

I want to see the source code of stats::reorder.

This answer seems not apply to built in packages which are compiled to bytecode:

> stats::reorder
function (x, ...) 
UseMethod("reorder")
>bytecode: 0x103321718<
>environment: namespace:stats<
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by DWin, joran, Andrie, Joshua Ulrich, Tyler Rinker Jul 7 '12 at 12:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with reorder being compiled to bytecode and everything to do with it being a generic function.

My answer here elaborates on this.

But specifically for this situation if you want to see the code you can use

# Find what methods are available for reorder
methods(reorder)
# Attempt to check out the code for reorder.default
reorder.default
# Use getAnywhere to view code regardless of if it is exported
getAnywhere(reorder.default)
share|improve this answer

As others have said, you want methods(reorder). But for your mode general question, the best way is to download the source code of R, and search the code with grep. You can also browse the code online but it's not always obvious in which file a particular function might live.

share|improve this answer

This isn't a matter of compilation, what you're seeing is the result of the fact that reorder is written to do different things depending on the class of what you want to reorder. There are separate reorder functions for different possible options, and you can list them by calling methods(reorder). You can then examine the source of whichever one is appropriate.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.