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This is probably a simple problem but I need to create the JavaScript equivalent to N instances of a 'class' whose state must be totally separate.

like:

var car = new Car('Ford');
var car = new Car('Toyota');

How can I achieve this?

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use an array object to store them:

var cars = [];

cars.push(new Car('Ford'));
cars.push(new Car('Toyota'));

cars[0].beep();

You can iterate over all the stored instances using a for loop:

for (var i = 0; i < cars.length; i++) {
  var car = cars[i];

  car.beep();
}
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For..in iteration should be protected from inherited properties using a hasOwnProperty test. Note also that it will not return the members in any particular order, the OP might be expecting Array properties to always be returned in order of numeric index. That isn't necessarily true (and can be shown not to be in some browsers). –  RobG Jul 7 '12 at 5:05
    
Can you point me to some documentation on this? I haven't really encountered problems with for...in, but I'd rather not pick up a bad habit. –  Blender Jul 7 '12 at 5:06
    
ES5 for..in states the order is not specified and that inherited properties are visited. IE returns properties in the order they were added, so if you add them out of sequence, that's how they're returned. Also deleting/adding a property moves it to last. Try it. –  RobG Jul 7 '12 at 5:09
    
Thanks, I'll take a good look at this. –  Blender Jul 7 '12 at 5:10
    
I'm not saying never use for..in with an array, it can be handy, just be aware of the issues. –  RobG Jul 7 '12 at 5:10
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It if very difficult to see what the problem is here.

From your code snippet I can see the only problem that you may have in creating new instances is that you'r giving it a the same name.

Give it some other var name:

var ford = new Car('Ford');
var toyota = new Car('Toyota');

Otherwise if you have an array of different makes and want to convert it into an array of car objects you can do this:

var types = ["Ford", "Toyota", "VW", "renault"];

var cars = {};

for (var i = 0; i != types.length ; i++)
  cars[types[i]] = new Car(types[i]);

You can access these cars like this:

var ford = cars.Ford;

or like this:

var ford = cars["Ford"];
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