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class Error1
{

public:

int errorcode;
Error1(int x):errorcode(x){ cout<<"CTOR Error1"<<endl; }
//Error1(Error1& obj ){
//    errorcode = obj.errorcode;
//    cout<<"CopyCTOR Error1"<<endl;
//}
~Error1(){cout<<"DTOR Error1"<<endl; }
};

void fun()
{
cout<<"Inside fun"<<endl;
throw(Error1(5));
}

int main()
{
try{

    fun();
}
catch(Error1& eobj)
{
    cout<<"Error1 type occured with code:"<<eobj.errorcode<<endl;
}
cin.get();

}

OUTPUT:

Inside fun

CTOR Error1

DTOR Error1

Error1 type occured with code:5

DTOR Error1

This output indicates that a Error1 object is copy constructed for the catch handler. Since copy constructor is not defined for Error1 object default copy constructor is used.

When i uncomment the commented section for defining a copy constructor i get the the following output.

Inside fun

CTOR Error1

Error1 type occured with code:5

DTOR Error1

Why is it that only one DTOR is getting called? Even if exception is caught by reference i believe a temporary is still created.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like the output is dependent on the compiler and exception runtime implementation. For instance, gcc 4.3.4 is not generating any temporaries for your first code example with the default copy-constructor. You can see an example here: ideone.com/9QyLf –  Jason Jul 7 '12 at 6:26
    
First of all if you define your DTOR as virtual, you'll get first behavior equal to the second one. –  klement Jul 7 '12 at 6:28
    
@klement: There's no polymorphic behavior happening here, so I believe using virtual DTOR's is unecessary –  Jason Jul 7 '12 at 6:29
    
@Jason: I've arranged an experiment, and that the result I got in VS2010 - virtual makes both code sections work equally. –  klement Jul 7 '12 at 6:33
    
@klement: In gcc I get the same results without adding virtual ... so again, using the virtual keyword may be a quirk specific to VS2010, but it's "unnecessary" per the C++ language in general for this specific scenario ... –  Jason Jul 7 '12 at 6:35

2 Answers 2

What compiler are you using?

When you introduce (i.e. uncomment) your version of copy constructor with Error1& obj argument, the code is supposed to become invalid. throw is supposed to be able to create a copy of its argument, while your version of copy constructor disables copying of temporaries. The code is ill-formed. If your compiler accepts it, its is probably because it illegally allows binding non-const references to temporaries (I suspect it is MSVC++ compiler with extensions enabled).

The original experiment works as it is supposed/allowed to. The argument of throw is copied to an internal temporary which is later used to initialize catch parameters. Although the compilers are allowed to use your original temporary directly, extending its lifetime accordingly.

share|improve this answer
1  
If he defines it as private it becomes invalid. He can still rely on default copy CTOR. –  klement Jul 7 '12 at 6:31
    
@klement: The user-defined CTOR from the OP takes a non-const reference type, which means it can't accept a temporary as an argument ... –  Jason Jul 7 '12 at 6:32
    
@klement: Firstly, declaring any copy constructor disables the compiler-provided one (which is probably what you called "default"). Secondly, the code is invalid even with public copy constructor as long as the reference parameter is non-const. Such copy-constructor cannot be used to copy temporaries, as I said already. –  AndreyT Jul 7 '12 at 6:34
    
Sorry, somehow misread you answer. I thought that you're saying if we're commenting out the copy CTOR code becomes invalid. –  klement Jul 7 '12 at 6:36
1  
@rocky: Note that throw/catch already has some capabilities to work around the restrictions of the language. For example, you can do throw 5 and catch (int &). I.e. it allows you to bind a non-const reference to a temporary. This is already quite a feat, prohibited anywhere else in the language. Maybe it is also legal to perform temporary elimination even when the source object is const... but I'm not sure about that. –  AndreyT Jul 7 '12 at 7:05

There may be other errors, but what I see right now is that throw(Error1(5)); creates a temporary (or rvalue) of type Error1. You want an lvalue, which means that you should either do throw(*new Error1(5)); (which I believe will create a memory leak, but I may be wrong), or you could create a global Error1 object and just throw that.

PS: I would be interested to know if throw(*new Error1(5)); does create a memory leak, if anyone would like to comment. Does catch destroy the object it catches? If so I think you should be fine with just creating new Error1s whenever you need them.

share|improve this answer
    
what would be your catch like? You are throwing the dereferenced pointer right? So a if your catch is like catch(Error1 obj) or catch(Error1& obj) it will lead to memory leak. –  hackrock Jul 7 '12 at 7:02
    
if you manually deleted your Error1 would it still leak memory? –  anthropomorphic Jul 7 '12 at 7:04
    
I believe you cant do a manual delete unless you throw by pointer and catch by pointer –  hackrock Jul 7 '12 at 7:07
    
I didn't know you could do that. I will try that later, thanks. –  anthropomorphic Jul 7 '12 at 7:09
1  
Not a good idea ... if you ever write code that other people will use that throw dynamically allocated objects like this, by convention they will most likely write catch statements that take l-value references, and you will be 100% guaranteed to have code that leaks. The exception runtime was created to handle temporary exception objects, so use the system the way it was designed and not try to out-smart it (and anyone else using your code). –  Jason Jul 7 '12 at 15:55

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