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Possible Duplicate:
Create std::list of value instead of std::list of pointers in recursive function

I have this class:

class C
{
public:

    C* parent;
    std::list<C> children;
};

I can use this class in this way for example:

C root;
C child;

root.children.push_back(child); // or other method of std::list (es: push_front, insert, ...)

// Here child.parent is root
// How can I set the parent of child?

I want to do this work internally to my class without losing the functionality of std::list, is it possible?

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marked as duplicate by ildjarn, casperOne Jul 10 '12 at 19:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Note that you're pushing a copy of child. –  ybungalobill Jul 7 '12 at 8:02
    
@ybungalobill yes you're righ, I want to set the parent of the child inserted in the list –  Nick Jul 7 '12 at 8:05
    
Please match the title and your actual question. –  Arne Jul 7 '12 at 8:06
    
Why would you mark your other identical question as answered then ask the same question again? –  ildjarn Jul 7 '12 at 8:06
    
@ildjarn Ahah! are you kidding? –  Nick Jul 7 '12 at 8:08

4 Answers 4

If I am understanding your question correctly, you want something like this:

class C {
public:
    C* parent;
    std::list<C *> children;
    explicit C(C *p = 0) : parent(p) {
        if (p) p->children.push_back(this);
    }
};

C root;
C child(&root);

Note that I changed your children list to take pointers. This is fine as long as C is not expected to manage the memory for the nodes, just refer to them.

The title of your question was: How to know if a std::list has been modified. From your comments, it seems like what you want is a proxy:

class ListProxy {
    std::list<C *> children;
public:
    // replicate list traits
    // ...

    void push_back (C *c) {
        children.push_back(c);
        //... do something
    }

    void erase (iterator i) {
        children.erase(i);
        //... do something
    }

    //...
};

The proxy delegates list functionality to the list, but augments behavior for those methods that would change the list.

class C {
public:
    C* parent;
    ListProxy children;
    explicit C(C *p = 0) : parent(p) {
        if (p) p->children.push_back(this);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
If I add the add_child method I loose all the functionality of the std::list if I make it private, and If I don't I can always use the push_back method and invalid my data structure. –  Nick Jul 7 '12 at 8:35
1  
@Nick: I am not sure what your concern is. Are you afraid of some other programmer accessing the children list and maliciously adding children? –  jxh Jul 7 '12 at 8:51
    
@Nick: I updated the answer. Regards –  jxh Jul 7 '12 at 9:12

I would suggest you to add one member function:

class C
{
    C* parent;
    std::list<C> children;  //make it private first
public:
    void add_child(C const & child)
    {
         children.push_back(child);
         children.back().parent = this; //make `this` child's parent
    }    
};
share|improve this answer
    
In this way I loose all functionality of std::list –  Nick Jul 7 '12 at 8:07
    
@Nick: You can expose those functions as member functions. I think that will be better, as it gives you an opportunity to choose proper name for them (which also matters), in addition to adding new functionalities, such as the one shown in my answer. –  Nawaz Jul 7 '12 at 8:09

You could implement interface functions in your class. For example:

class C
{
private:
    std::list<C *> children;
public:
    C* parent;

    void AddChild(C *child);
};

Then, just do this in the AddChild function:

void C::AddChild(C *child)
{
     children.push_back(child);

     // Do internal work here...
}
share|improve this answer

First of all: Since you seem to have linked list on your own, you could just add a AddChild method to your class. This can use the std::list functionality.

I'm quite sure that you don't want to store values but pointers to C, as you possibly do not want to copy your C every time you add it to the list.

public:
void AddChild(C *child)
{
    this.children.push_back(child);
}

Use it as follows:

C *root = new C();
C *child = new C();
child->parent = root;
root->AddChild(child);

You can set the parent in the AddChild also, which gives you some chance of having coherent lists (each child has a proper parent set).

But, if you are interested in changes, use the Observer pattern.

Here is an article on that, c++ code samples are included there: Observer pattern

share|improve this answer
    
His list is of type C not of C* –  mathematician1975 Jul 7 '12 at 8:06
    
Think he wants to change that. What do you think? –  Mare Infinitus Jul 7 '12 at 8:08
    
Quite possibly, I just think you should perhaps mention that you have changed the type of the object in his list. –  mathematician1975 Jul 7 '12 at 8:09
    
edited for clarification –  Mare Infinitus Jul 7 '12 at 8:15

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