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Sorry if my question is a bit unclear; I'm finding it a little tough to find the wording. I spent several hours screwing around in Eclipse, cruising the JavaDoc, and Google, as well as SO. I learned a lot, but didn't find an answer.

What I'd like to be able to do is define an Enum, eg.:

public enum Animals {
    Cow,
    Chicken,
    Sheep,
    Horse;
}

and have each enum constant define an instantiable class that's not a local class. Would the following work? And if not, why, and what would?

In some file:

abstract public class Animal {

    private String nameString;

    public String getName() {
        return nameString;
    }

}

In another:

public enum Animals {

    Cow ((new Animal() {
        private boolean hasMilk;
        {
            nameString = "Cow";
            hasMilk = false;
        }
        public boolean hasMilk() {
            return hasMilk;
        }
    }).getClass()),

    Chicken ((new Animal() {
        private boolean hasFeathers;
        {
            nameString = "Chicken";
            hasFeathers = true;
        }
        public boolean hasFeathers() {
            return hasFeathers;
        }
    }).getClass()),

    Sheep ((new Animal() {
        private boolean isShorn;
        {
            nameString = "Cow";
            isShorn = false;
        }
        public boolean isShorn() {
            return isShorn;
        }
        public void Shear() {
            isShorn = true;
        }
    }).getClass()),

    Horse ((new Animal() {
        {
            nameString = "Cow";
        }
    }).getClass());


    private Class<? extends Animal> animalClass;

    private Animals(Class<? extends Animal> a) {
        animalClass = a;
    }

    public Class<? extends Animal> getAnimalClass() {
        return animalClass;
    }
}

And then, in some other method of some other class, be able to do this:

Animal farmAnimal;
farmAnimal = Animals.Sheep.getAnimalClass().newInstance();
boolean shorn = farmAnimal.isShorn();

(The value of shorn being false at this point);

farmAnimal.shear();
shorn = farmAnimal.isShorn();

(shorn == true)

farmAnimal = Animals.Sheep.getAnimalClass().newInstance();
shorn = farmAnimal.isShorn();

(shorn == false)

Obviously, this isn't the best way to do what I've done here, but that's not the point. I know I can specify behaviour for enum constants, but that doesn't make them multiply-instantiable as distinct instances. I want to be able to create multiple instances (or copies) of various enum constants, with different instance variables (and different quantities/types of instance variables), with different accessor methods, which I can then do stuff to (alter instance variables) without modifying the enum constant.

I get that enum constants are designed to be immutable. That doesn't clash with my idea; I want each enum constant to represent an immutable definition of a mutable class.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You can do something like this:

public enum AnimalType {
    COW {
        @Override
        public Animal createNew() {
            return new Cow();
        }
    },
    HORSE {
        @Override
        public Animal createNew() {
            return new Horse();
        }
    };

    public abstract Animal createNew();
}

public abstract class Animal {
    private final AnimalType type;
    private final String nameString;

    public Animal(final AnimalType type, final String nameString) {
        super();
        this.type = type;
        this.nameString = nameString;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return nameString;
    }

    public AnimalType getType() {
        return type;
    }
}

public class Horse extends Animal {
    public Horse() {
        super(AnimalType.HORSE, "Horse");
    }
}

public class Cow extends Animal {
    private boolean milk;

    public Cow() {
        super(AnimalType.COW, "Cow");
    }

    public boolean hasMilk() {
        return milk;
    }

    public void setMilk(final boolean milk) {
        this.milk = milk;
    }
}

@Test
public void testEnum() {
    Cow cow = (Cow) AnimalType.COW.createNew();
    Horse horse = (Horse) AnimalType.HORSE.createNew();

    System.out.println("cow  : " + cow.getType() + ", has milk: " + cow.hasMilk());
    System.out.println("horse: " + horse.getType());
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. As far as I can see, your solution could accomplish the end result I'm after, but it doesn't feel very satisfying. It's possible that I'm asking for a language feature that doesn't really exist. On a somewhat related note, is there any reason why I shouldn't declare all the Animal subclasses within the Animal declaration, as nested classes? That kinda thing (and grouping together class definitions as enum constants) appeals to my organizational side. –  Roger C Jul 7 '12 at 8:54

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