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I'm trying to delete all nodes from my queue of structures.

Structure:

struct element{

    int id;
    int sign;
    int year;
    int month;
    double amount;

    struct element *next;
};

struct queue{
    struct element *head;  

    int size;
};

And the function I wrote:

void delete(struct queue *queue) {
    if (queue->size == 0){
        printf("Structure is empty\n");
    }
    else {
        struct element* this;
        struct element* other;      

        for(this=queue->head;this!=NULL;this=other)
        {
            other=this->next;
            free(this);
        }
        free(queue);
    }   
}

It doesn't work, and I'm out of ideas. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
1  
What happens? Do you get an error? –  Mr Lister Jul 7 '12 at 9:19
    
One thing I can see is that the info about how many elements you have is redundant. You have size in queue, but also a NULL pointer for next in the last element in the queue. Have you made certain that those always match? I mean, if you traverse the list, is it guaranteed that you can run size elements before you hit NULL? –  Mr Lister Jul 7 '12 at 9:22
    
@MrLister When I try to use this function Netbeans breaks it (Signal received: SIGABRT (Aborted)). No specifics –  ozech Jul 7 '12 at 9:23
    
But in which line does it abort? Can you debug the program and/or insert some diagnostics printf statements? –  Mr Lister Jul 7 '12 at 9:24
2  
How do you call delete? I suspect, queue is not allocated on the heap. –  Henrik Jul 7 '12 at 9:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your delete routine, you do not free the queue if the size is empty, but you do free it if the size is non-empty. You should probably do the same for both cases. That is, either don't free in both places, or free in both places.

It is bothersome to need to figure out what the right thing to do is, because delete can not know how the queue was allocated. Given your current design, a way out may be to pass a flag to delete to indicate what it should do:

void delete(struct queue *queue, int do_free) {
    if (queue->size == 0){
        printf("Structure is empty\n");
    }
    else {
        struct element* this;
        struct element* other;
        for(this=queue->head;this!=NULL;this=other) {
            other=this->next;
            free(this);
        }
        queue->head = 0;
        queue->size = 0;
    }
    if (do_free) free(queue);
}

struct queue new;
/* ... */
delete(&new, 0);      /* don't free the queue */

struct queue *empty_new = malloc(sizeof(struct queue));
empty_new->size = 0;
delete(empty_new, 1); /* free the empty queue */
share|improve this answer
    
Why should I free it if it's empty (assuming I understood your point)? –  ozech Jul 7 '12 at 9:40
    
@ozech: I'll answer with a question: Why do you free it after you empty it out? –  jxh Jul 7 '12 at 9:41
    
To wipe it out from the stack completely –  ozech Jul 7 '12 at 9:43
    
@ozech: You can only free memory that was returned by malloc or calloc or realloc. An empty queue on the stack is taking up just as much memory as an emptied out queue on the stack. –  jxh Jul 7 '12 at 9:44

Here

struct queue new;
//...
delete(&new);

new is allocated on the stack, so don't call free(queue) in delete. Instead, set queue->head = NULL; queue->size = 0; to indicate that the queue is now empty as mentioned by @kirill.

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I should call free(&queue) instead? –  ozech Jul 7 '12 at 9:42
    
@ozech - no, if it's allocated on the stack as in the code in my answer, it will be freed automatically. –  Henrik Jul 7 '12 at 9:45

How about just passing the first element of the queue.

void delete(element *el ) {
    if(el) {
        delete(el->next );
        free(el);
    }
}

with

typedef struct _element{

  int id;
  int sign;
  int year;
  int month;
  double amount;

  struct _element *next;

} element;
share|improve this answer

you might have forgotten to update at the end of the function the pointer to NULL as well as changing the size of the queue to 0.

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