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I have seen the type NONE in a book but with no explanation... I understood that this is a type in some languages but I wish to understand it in depth! Is it like void? or like NULL?

The book called "Programming language concepts and paradigms" (writen by David A.Watt) and it has a very good "wide view" of many languages and the differences between one another. In what languages do we use NONE (except Python)? Is where more than one purpose for the nonetype?

Thanks! Amihay

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1  
In which language!? – Ixx Jul 7 '12 at 9:57
    
Which book? No language which I have ever used has a type called NONE. It would help if you could specify the language which the book is talking about – Ben Cottrell Jul 7 '12 at 9:57
    
Are you asking about Python? – Pigueiras Jul 7 '12 at 9:58
    
The book called "Programming language concepts and paradigms" (writen by David A.Watt) and it has a very good "wide view" of many languages and the differences between one another. In what languages do we use NONE (except Python)? Is where more than one purpose for the nonetype? – Ami Winter Jul 7 '12 at 12:57

Python has a NoneType for the None value. None is similar to null in other languages.

>>> type(None)
<type 'NoneType'>

Other languages may use None to mean something else.

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IMO, the NoneType in python is quite equivalent to a void-type in other languages, such as C/C++. Example:

>>> def foo():
...     pass
... 
>>> type(foo())
<type 'NoneType'>

The function foo() has no return statement, so it's like a void-returning function in C/C++.

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