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I have three string arrays:

private readonly string[] PMCTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMCIP", "Description", "Cam1ReferencePoints", "Cam2ReferencePoints", "DataserverIP" };
private readonly string[] PMDTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMDIP", "Description" };
private readonly string[] PMDZonesTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMDIP", "Description", "Zone" };

I want to construct an array that points to these arrays as:

private var[] ArrayReferences = new var[] { PMCTableColumnNames, PMDTableColumnNames, PMDZonesTableColumnNames };

When i put index to this (ArrayReferences) array, i want to get all elements of the specific array like this:

string[] _PMDTableColumnNames = ArrayReferences[1];

How can i do that?

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1  
Why are you using var[]? And are you telling us that string[] _PMDTableColumnNames = ArrayReferences[1]; is not working? –  Oded Jul 7 '12 at 10:52
    
@Oded: I believe it is legal to use var[] here, since the compiler can infer the type? –  carlpett Jul 7 '12 at 10:54
    
@carlpett - I don't believe it is a valid use. –  Oded Jul 7 '12 at 10:55
    
No, i write "var" because i want to express my idea. I know that it can't be "var". –  blabla Jul 7 '12 at 10:55
    
Then don't post code that can't even compile (unless that's the point of the question). –  Oded Jul 7 '12 at 10:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create an array of arrays:

private string[][] ArrayReferences;

Note you'll have to initialise ArrayReferences in the constructor since you can't reference the other arrays in the field initialiser. i.e.

public class ClassName
{
    private readonly string[] PMCTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMCIP", "Description", "Cam1ReferencePoints", "Cam2ReferencePoints", "DataserverIP" };
    private readonly string[] PMDTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMDIP", "Description" };
    private readonly string[] PMDZonesTableColumnNames = new string[] { "PMDIP", "Description", "Zone" };

    private string[][] ArrayReferences;

    public ClassName()
    {
        ArrayReferences = new string[][] { PMCTableColumnNames, PMDTableColumnNames, PMDZonesTableColumnNames };
    }

    void SomeMethod()
    {
        string[] _PMDTableColumnNames = ArrayReferences[1];
    }
}
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Arrays should be static, right? –  blabla Jul 7 '12 at 10:56
    
@petre - Should? That's not a requirement of the language. How do you mean "should"? –  Oded Jul 7 '12 at 10:57
    
@Oded because the first line of this answer gives an error: Cannot access non-static field in static context if the three arrays are not static. –  codesparkle Jul 7 '12 at 11:00
    
Yes, Oded is right. –  blabla Jul 7 '12 at 11:00
    
by the way: the term for an array of arrays is jagged array. –  codesparkle Jul 7 '12 at 11:06
string[][] ArrayReferences = new [] { PMCTableColumnNames, PMDTableColumnNames, PMDZonesTableColumnNames };

or just

var ArrayReferences = new [] { PMCTableColumnNames, PMDTableColumnNames, PMDZonesTableColumnNames };

should do it.

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You simply can use ArrayList class it's meant for this kind of purposes.

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If the collection length is fixed, an array is fine. If you need to dynamically modify the collection, then a generic List<T> is preferable to ArrayList. –  Lee Jul 7 '12 at 11:02
    
No I don't think so, ArrayList has add method by which you can add elements to your ArrayList dynamically, And you don't need to specify the length of the ArrayList in advance. But yes for a typesafe list List<T> is a better option. –  yogi Jul 7 '12 at 11:05
    
@yogi might be a good idea to read @lee's answer again, and read up on List and ArrayList. –  codesparkle Jul 7 '12 at 11:08

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