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I am sorry if this is a bit broad but I've been working on a structure for a couple of days and I can't seem to figure this out the cleanest and most efficient way to do this. I could share the tables that I've created for now but I really think it's not close to how a proper diagram should be.

Let me describe my problem a bit: I have Stores, Countries, Districts, Categories. Each store could belong to different Countries/Districts enabling Store Branch manipulation. Of course a store could belong to multiple Categories too, for example Store X could be under both Food and Beverages and Night Clubs. A Country will have multiple Districts and Stores, and a Store could have many Countries and Districts.

I am writing my application using C# and I don't have problems creating data-layer objects and classes. But I need the proper MSSQL structure to manipulate and filter down data based on given criteria.

The most important criteria would be: Going through Countries as a first step, then locating Stores within that Country as a global view, then it's important to sort Stores based on Districts and/or Categories within that Country.

Please let me know if you need me to share what I have for now, but since I'm on Stack Overflow asking this question you can guess that I'm doing this the wrong way.

Anyway, if you could shed some light on this issue and explain how things should be done properly I would highly appreciate it.

Thanks in advance.

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Could a store belong to a country, but not necessarily belong to a district within that particular country? –  Zane Bien Jul 7 '12 at 11:24
    
No unfortunately, because I have to filter down stores eventually based on countries then districts. What I mean is, I am thinking of a way to get all stores in a country then filter those stores in that country by their respective districts and categories within that country/district combination at a later stage. –  user1027620 Jul 7 '12 at 11:28
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Whenever you have many-to-many relationships (e.g. one district may contain many stores; one store may be contained by many districts), you are going to need to use cross-reference tables between those entities.

I'm assuming that a particular district may only be contained by one single country. Here is how I would model out your schenario:

countries(country_id [PK], name, ...)
districts(district_id [PK], country_id [FK], name, ...)
districts_has_stores(district_id [PK], store_id [PK])

stores(store_id [PK], name, ...)

categories_has_stores(category_id [PK], store_id [PK])
categories(category_id [PK], name, ...)

In ER:

ER Diagram

districts_has_stores and categories_has_stores are the cross-reference tables representing the many-to-many relationships between your entities.

Based off of this model, you can retrieve all stores within a particular country, and order the stores by district name using the following SQL:

SELECT
    c.*
FROM 
    districts a
INNER JOIN 
    districts_has_stores b ON a.district_id = b.district_id
INNER JOIN
    stores c ON b.store_id = c.store_id
WHERE
    a.country_id = <country_id here>
ORDER BY
    a.name

Retrieving the count of stores in each country:

SELECT
    a.country_id, 
    COUNT(*) AS store_count
FROM
    districts a
INNER JOIN
    districts_has_stores b ON a.district_id = b.district_id
GROUP BY
    a.country_id

Edit: As per your comment to this answer, here's an example of how you can retrieve all stores that have a category_id of 1:

SELECT
    b.*
FROM
    categories_has_stores a
INNER JOIN
    stores b ON a.store_id = b.store_id
WHERE
    a.category_id = 1

Retrieving all stores in a particular category_id (1) and filtering the result to only include those stores within either districts 4 or 5.

SELECT DISTINCT
    b.*
FROM
    categories_has_stores a
INNER JOIN
    stores b ON a.store_id = b.store_id
INNER JOIN
    districts_has_stores c ON b.store_id = c.store_id
WHERE
    a.store_id = 1 AND
    c.district_id IN (4,5)
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+1 for the diagram. My laptop battery is about to die else I would have done something similar. –  Dan Andrews Jul 7 '12 at 11:46
    
+1 Amazing answer! Thank you very much for the rich answer you've provided. Would you mind explaining how this could work for retrieving a Store depending on the Country/-District-/Category criteria? –  user1027620 Jul 7 '12 at 12:07
    
In response to your question, for example when clicking on a certain category what would be the method to get all stores within that category, or when stores are broken down into country/district how would I return the stores based on a certain category like "Food" for example that has an ID of 1. –  user1027620 Jul 7 '12 at 12:12
    
Answer edited with examples more along the lines of what you may be looking for. There are many ways you can query this design, answering pretty much any question you can think of (e.g. Get a list of countries a particular store is in, Get the countries which don't have a store in a particular category, etc..., etc...) –  Zane Bien Jul 7 '12 at 12:30
1  
@user1027620, you would use 3 INSERT statements: the first one being the store itself (e.g. INSERT INTO stores VALUES (..., ...)), then you would get the id of the inserted store, and then insert the districts that store is in, which is also defining the countries the store is in because districts have a N:1 relationship with countries: (e.g. INSERT INTO districts_has_stores VALUES (<store_id>, <district_id>)) and use however many insert statements you need depending on how many districts you want to associate with that store. Finally, do the same thing for categories_has_stores. –  Zane Bien Jul 7 '12 at 13:03
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You would have a country table with an identity column. Each store can "be-a" Category, you'd have to have an association table which is a child table of the store table which would have a store ID and the ID from the Category table. Each store would belong to a country so your store table would store the ID of the country from the Country table. Similar to the Category, your District table would have a child table which stores the ID of the District and of the Country (since each district can have multiple countries)

Store Table

  • ID INT IDENTITY PK
  • Category FK
  • Country FK (where it actually lives, a 1 to 1)
  • District FK

Category Table

  • ID INT IDENTITY PK

StoreCategory Table

  • StoreID FK
  • CategoryID FK

Country Table

  • ID INT IDENTITY PK

District Table

  • ID INT IDENTITY PK

DistrictCountry Table

  • DistrictID FK
  • CountryID FK
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is an associating table the same as a junction table? –  user1027620 Jul 7 '12 at 11:29
    
If you want to call it a junction table. It is really a child table. So you have a parent and child table relationship. –  Dan Andrews Jul 7 '12 at 11:30
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I think below should work for you.

Countries
=========
CountryId, CountryName

Districts
=========
DistrictId, CountryId, DistrictName

Stores
=========
StoreId, DistrictId, Storename


Categories
=========
CategoryId, Categoryname


StoreCategories
=========
Storecategoryid, StoreId, CategoryId
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enter image description here

It's very easy, you have StoryCategory to solve the "many stores can have many categories" problem. The District and Country tables allow you to store the location of your store.

I advise you to look at the following documentation to expand your database design knowledge:

Many To Many

10 useful articles

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