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Just a general question. Is it better for database keep values or NULLs?

I have a commission field which calculates every day and is based on total amount value condition. Next date commission calculates on previous one and sums with total value. A commission can be 0.00 as well but not negative. Is it better to keep zero values or fill them as NULLs and use 'ISNULL(comm, 0)' in queries rather just 'comm'?

Which is better for performance and DB capacity?

UPD: Performance is just good. I wonder if there any storage capacity difference when you have hundreds of users records for each day? Is NULL as EMPTY really that EMPTY or it takes some bytes when the storage value of 0.00 is less than NULL itself.

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4  
NULL generally means "has no meaningful value". 0.00 sounds like it is a meaningful value in your scenario. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '12 at 13:51
    
Regarding performance capacity - you have a small table if it is less than a million rows, and large starts maybe at 100 million. Get real here - a couple of hundred rows per day is something my smartphone was able to handle, some years ago. – TomTom Jul 7 '12 at 14:38
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the commission value is 0, you should keep it as 0 ,Not NULL. Why do you want to call the ISNULL function to convert it back to 0 again ? that is wrong and it makes the future programmer who is going to handle your code , sit and think 2 days why it was designed so.

Keep it simple and clean. Use 0.

from msdn,

A value of NULL indicates that the value is unknown. A value of NULL is different from an empty or zero value.

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A nullable column typically uses an extra bit to flag a null. Recording the fact that something is "empty" is still information that has to be encoded in some form. Clearly that involves both storage and processing. Because of the way rows are laid out in pages the storage component still might not really matter. Either way, that is not really your most important consideration.

You're going to have to write the ISNULL check every time you reference that column. It's likely to complicate the use of indexes. You're going to get tired of typing it.

If zero is what you mean then store it that way; everything is much simpler. Save the keystrokes for explicitly stating "NULL" and "NOT NULL" column definitions in the DDL.

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NULL really means NULL and 0 means a known value of zero. I doubt that there's any difference in performance, but its just a general programming logic to use the right variable where suitable

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There is no difference in performance? When using ISNULL(comm, 0) in every query? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 7 '12 at 14:08
    
I believe whether you are calling ISNULL or doing a x>0? the value has to be accessed once.and the isnull function is an inline function.it should be fast.a small test case could prove me wrong though – Moataz Elmasry Jul 7 '12 at 14:14
    
Performance is just good. I wonder if there any storage capacity difference when you have hundreds of users records for each day? Is NULL as EMPTY really that EMPTY or it takes some bytes when the storage value of 0.00 is less than NULL itself. – newdorp Jul 7 '12 at 14:26
    
Well this depends on the data type of the column I guess. an int is usually 4 bytes. NULL could be defined using a macro, which could be optimized to occupy just 1 byte.but as said from common sense side, I'd do it using 0, since it expresses the real value of commission. if you want to hack further into this topic. create 2 databases, each with one table. which holds either NULLs or 0's. fill each table with 100 million entries or something and compare the sizes – Moataz Elmasry Jul 7 '12 at 14:45

Here you can find out how sqlserver stores NULLs

http://weblogs.sqlteam.com/mladenp/archive/2007/09/06/How_does_SQL_Server_really_store_NULL-s.aspx

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Nice research. Thanks! – newdorp Jul 8 '12 at 11:38

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