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I'm building a buffer in Java that will collect write actions requested by many threads, and flush them as a group, say, once per second. I'd like to give it a method called waitForFlush that will block and thread that calls it until the next flush event completes. Meanwhile, a separate, standalone thread is flushing and sleeping in a loop. So I'm basically looking for a concurrency structure or pattern that will allow many threads to block at a particular point, and then release them all simultaneously, and I'm finding that none of Java's builtin concurrency primitives are a really close match for this. The best I've come up with so far is wait/notifyAll, as follows:

public class Buffer {

  private volatile long lastFlushTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
  private final Object flushMonitor = new Object();

  public void waitForFlush() {
    long entryTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    synchronized(flushMonitor) {
      while(lastFlushTime <= entryTime) {
        flushMonitor.wait();
      }
    }
  }

  public void flush() {
    // do flush stuff here
    synchronized(flushMonitor) {
      lastFlushTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
      flushMonitor.notifyAll();
    }
  }
}

Although I think this would work fine in practice, the synchronization block in waitForNotify() still feels somewhat imperfect to me. Ideally, for this use case, you would be able to call wait() without synchronizing on the associated Object, and all of the blocked threads would be released at the precise same moment when notifyAll() is called, instead of having to exit the synchronized block one-by-one.

So, in general, is there a better way to block and simultaneously release a variable number of threads than I've outlined above (the Semaphore and CountDownLatch classes would only work for for a fixed number of threads, I think)?

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instead of having to exit the synchronized block one-by-one why is this a problem? –  Tudor Jul 7 '12 at 14:14
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Though a CountDownLatch would work for a one time case as Marko Topolnik and munyengm mention. It fails in a cyclic scenario (that is you can only await & countDown once per CDL). Then you may consider a CyclicBarrier, but that fails in your case because you would need to know the number of threads being used.

If you can use Java 7 I recommend Phaser. You can have single thread signalling to many waiting threads and reuse.

final Phaser phaser = new Phaser(1);//register one thread to arrive

 public void waitForFlush() {
    int phase = phaser.getPhase();
    phaser.awaitAdvance(phase);    
 }

  public void flush() {
      lastFlushTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
      phaser.arrive(); //signals all waiting threads on the current phase and will increment the phase by 1
  }
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Does that mean that phase continues to grow unbounded? Won't it overflow eventually? If a CDL is used, it's not such a big deal to replace it with a new one. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 7 '12 at 14:43
1  
Neat- this solution would let me avoid System.currentTimeMillis entirely and just use the phase number, which seems cleaner, in that I didn't actually care when the flush occurred, just that it occurred after some other time. –  gsteff Jul 7 '12 at 14:47
    
@MarkoTopolnik It can reach Integer.MAX_VALUE but will not overflow. Instead it will reset to 0, per JavaDoc The phase number starts at zero, and advances when all parties arrive at the phaser, wrapping around to zero after reaching Integer.MAX_VALUE. –  John Vint Jul 7 '12 at 14:49
    
@gsteff You may want to continue with a timestamp as explained in my above comment. –  John Vint Jul 7 '12 at 14:50
1  
Why would I still need a timestamp? According to the Javadocs for awaitAdvance, it waits until the phase is not equal to the given phase... so it's doing a not-equal check, not a greater-than check. Thus, wraparound shouldn't break anything, if that's what you're referring to, right? –  gsteff Jul 7 '12 at 14:55
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If you use the CountDownLatch properly, I think it can do it for you. The way is to make your variable number of threads await on the latch, and the flushing thread calls countDown. The latch is always initialized to 1. This is how it would work:

public class FlushControl
{
  private volatile CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1);

  public void awaitFlush() throws InterruptedException { latch.await(); }

  public void flush() {
    final CountDownLatch l = latch;
    latch = new CountDownLatch(1);
    l.countDown();
  }
}
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Does that mean that, to release the latch, I'd call countDown in a loop until the getCount() returns 0? –  gsteff Jul 7 '12 at 14:31
    
You initialize it to 1 and then a single countDown releases it. await DOES NOT INCREMENT the latch. In fact, NOTHING ever increments the countdown latch. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 7 '12 at 14:34
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Sounds like you need a CountDownLatch

A synchronization aid that allows one or more threads to wait until a set of operations being performed in other threads completes.

An Example:

public class Buffer {

    private volatile long lastFlushTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    private CountDownLatch flushCountDownLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);
    private final Object flushEvent = new Object();
    private Boolean hasBeenFlushed = true;

    public void waitForFlush() {
        long entryTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        // wait for the buffer to be flushed.
        flushCountDownLatch.await();
        // buffer has been flushed

        synchronized (flushEvent) {
            if(hasBeenFlushed) {
                // create a new CountDownLatch
                flushCountDownLatch = new CountDownLatch(1);
                hasBeenFlushed = false;
            }
        }

    }

    public void flush() {
        // do flush stuff here
        synchronized (flushEvent) {
            hasBeenFlushed = true;
            flushCountDownLatch.countDown();
        }
    }
}
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He already mentions CDL in his question. –  Marko Topolnik Jul 7 '12 at 14:22
    
    
Maybe he needs an idea how to use it properly? –  Marko Topolnik Jul 7 '12 at 14:24
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