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We've been using this method for sorting a generic List<>. Recently, we noticed incorrect results when the target property in T was a nullable type (decimal?). Any ideas how to correct?

public void SortList<T>(List<T> dataSource, string fieldName, SortDirection sortDirection)
{
    PropertyInfo propInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(fieldName);
    Comparison<T> compare = delegate(T a, T b)
    {
        bool asc = sortDirection == SortDirection.Ascending;
        object valueA = asc ? propInfo.GetValue(a, null) : propInfo.GetValue(b, null);
        object valueB = asc ? propInfo.GetValue(b, null) : propInfo.GetValue(a, null);

        return valueA is IComparable ? ((IComparable)valueA).CompareTo(valueB) : 0;
    };
    dataSource.Sort(compare);
}

Above code from Phil Hustead's article, "Sorting Generic Lists and IEnumerables by Object Property Name" http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/27851/Sorting-Generic-Lists-and-IEnumerables-by-Object-P

For instance, for my Employee objects with nullable decimal property Hours.

The nullable hours 107, null, 8, 152, 64, null sorts to 8, null, 64, null, 107, 152.

The nulls should sort, I think, to the beginning or end of the list.

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1  
Please provide some sample input that you find problematic with the both actual result and the result you would want instead. And why would you even use your method when dealing with List<decimal?> - just use List's Sort method and a default comparer will do the trick. –  Nikola Anusev Jul 7 '12 at 15:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change your method to

public static void SortList<T>(List<T> dataSource, string fieldName, SortDirection sortDirection)
{
    PropertyInfo propInfo = typeof(T).GetProperty(fieldName);
    Comparison<T> compare = delegate(T a, T b)
    {
        bool asc = sortDirection == SortDirection.Ascending;
        object valueA = asc ? propInfo.GetValue(a, null) : propInfo.GetValue(b, null);
        object valueB = asc ? propInfo.GetValue(b, null) : propInfo.GetValue(a, null);

        if(valueA == null)
        {
            if(valueB == null)
            {
                return 0;
            }
            else
            {
                return asc ? -1 : 1;
            }
        }
        if(valueB == null)
        {
            return asc ? 1 : -1;
        }

        return valueA is IComparable ? ((IComparable)valueA).CompareTo(valueB) : 0;
    };
    dataSource.Sort(compare);
}

Main issue is that you are checking valueA for IComparable only, and if valueA == null - comparison returns that objects are equal, no matter what is in valueB. When nullable value is boxed (and this is exactly what is happening here) it is represented by an actual value or null.

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When calling this method with "Value" (which is only property name I can think of that would make sense when using this with decimal?) as fieldName, you'll get a TargetException. –  Nikola Anusev Jul 7 '12 at 15:38
    
Yes, but the question is a bit confusing. OP is sorting objects with a nullable property, not a list with decimal? (T is Employee, fieldName is Hours and Hours is decimal?) –  max Jul 7 '12 at 15:42
    
Thanks. Excellent answer and very helpful explanation. –  Rox Wen Jul 7 '12 at 15:45
    
Aha, didn't notice the OP's edit. I thought that OP really wanted to sort a decimal?List. –  Nikola Anusev Jul 7 '12 at 15:45

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