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In Effective C++ (Item 18: Make interfaces easy to use correctly and hard to use incorrectly), I saw a code sample similar to the following:

class Month
{
public:
    static Month Jan()
    {
        return Month(1);
    }

    static Month Feb()
    {
        return Month(2);
    }

    //...

    static Month Dec()
    {
        return Month(12);
    }

private:
    explicit Month(int nMonth)
        : m_nMonth(nMonth)
    {
    }

private:
    int m_nMonth;
};

Date date(Month::Mar(), Day(30), Year(1995));

Are there any drawbacks of changing the functions so that they return static const reference to Month?

class Month
{
public:
    static const Month& Jan()
    {
        static Month month(1);
        return month;
    }

    static const Month& Feb()
    {
        static Month month(2);
        return month;
    }

    //...

    static const Month& Dec()
    {
        static Month month(12);
        return month;
    }

private:
    explicit Month(int nMonth)
        : m_nMonth(nMonth)
    {
    }

private:
    int m_nMonth;
};

I thought the second version is a bit more efficient than the first one.

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1  
The primary thing is that your code isn't threadsafe in C++03, only conforming C++11 compilers. – ildjarn Jul 7 '12 at 15:33
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Reason 1: It's not better.

Returning by value incurs the cost of copying the entire object.

Returning by reference incurs the cost of copying what's effectively a pointer, plus the cost of dereferencing that pointer.

Since Month is the size of an int:

  • Copying the reference is no faster
  • Dereferencing would still be incurred

So in general, returning by const reference is an optimization chosen to prevent what would be a costly copy.

Reason 2: static makes it worse

Unlike C, C++ promises that a static variable in a function will be constructed at the time of the function's first call.

In practice this means that every call to the function must begin with some unseen logic to determine if it's the first call.

See also Vaughn Cato's answer

See also ildjam's comment

share|improve this answer
    
So returning a reference to an object is more efficient only when size of object is greater than primitive data types? – Blood Jul 7 '12 at 15:31
    
What if the Month class had other member variables in it? – jpen Jul 7 '12 at 15:35
    
@DrewDormann okey, thanks. Now it's clear :) +1 – Blood Jul 7 '12 at 15:39
    
@jpen: There's no definitive rule, but as the object grows it becomes more likely that returning a reference would be more efficient. – Drew Dormann Jul 7 '12 at 16:21
    
what if each static function returned a private static class member instead? or each month was a public static member? – d7samurai Jan 14 '14 at 7:57

Some compilers won't inline methods that contain static local variables, and inlining is the most important performance optimization here.

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