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A great programming resource, Bit Twiddling Hacks, proposes (here) the following method to compute log2 of a 32-bit integer:

#define LT(n) n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n, n
static const char LogTable256[256] = 
{
    -1, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3,
    LT(4), LT(5), LT(5), LT(6), LT(6), LT(6), LT(6),
    LT(7), LT(7), LT(7), LT(7), LT(7), LT(7), LT(7), LT(7)
};

unsigned int v; // 32-bit word to find the log of
unsigned r;     // r will be lg(v)
register unsigned int t, tt; // temporaries
if (tt = v >> 16)
{
    r = (t = tt >> 8) ? 24 + LogTable256[t] : 16 + LogTable256[tt];
}
else 
{
    r = (t = v >> 8) ? 8 + LogTable256[t] : LogTable256[v];
}

and mentions that

The lookup table method takes only about 7 operations to find the log of a 32-bit value. If extended for 64-bit quantities, it would take roughly 9 operations.

but, alas, doesn't give any additional info about which way one should actually go to extend the algorithm to 64-bit integers.

Any hints about how a 64-bit algorithm of this kind would look like?

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Use more ifs. –  dbaupp Jul 7 '12 at 15:37
3  
@dbaupp I've got bags of ifs of all possible kinds, sorts, and taste, which ones would do best? –  Desmond Hume Jul 7 '12 at 15:41
4  
That's just an academical question, right? Otherwise just use _BitScanReverse64 (msvc) or __builtin_clzll (gcc) –  harold Jul 7 '12 at 15:42
    
Ones like the ones you already have. (Using the most naive extension, it'll look something like if (tt = v >> 48) { ... } else if (tt = v >> 32) { ... } ..., although this will perform marginally worse than the proper binary search Kendall correctly suggests.) –  dbaupp Jul 7 '12 at 15:43
    
It uses less operations than DeBruijn algorithm from the same page, but more branching. I wonder which one works better (faster?) in practice. –  AndreyT Jul 7 '12 at 16:05
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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Intrinsic functions are really fast but still are insufficient for a truly cross-platform, compiler-independent implementation of log2. So in case if anyone is interested, here is the fastest, branch-free, CPU-abstract DeBruijn-like algorithm I've come to while researching the topic on my own.

const int tab64[64] = {
    63,  0, 58,  1, 59, 47, 53,  2,
    60, 39, 48, 27, 54, 33, 42,  3,
    61, 51, 37, 40, 49, 18, 28, 20,
    55, 30, 34, 11, 43, 14, 22,  4,
    62, 57, 46, 52, 38, 26, 32, 41,
    50, 36, 17, 19, 29, 10, 13, 21,
    56, 45, 25, 31, 35, 16,  9, 12,
    44, 24, 15,  8, 23,  7,  6,  5};

int log2_64 (uint64_t value)
{
    value |= value >> 1;
    value |= value >> 2;
    value |= value >> 4;
    value |= value >> 8;
    value |= value >> 16;
    value |= value >> 32;
    return tab64[((uint64_t)((value - (value >> 1))*0x07EDD5E59A4E28C2)) >> 58];
}

The part of rounding down to the next lower power of 2 was taken from Power-of-2 Boundaries and the part of getting the number of trailing zeros was taken from BitScan (the (bb & -bb) code there is to single out the rightmost bit that is set to 1, which is not need after we've rounded the value down to the next power of 2).

And the 32-bit implementation, by the way, is

const int tab32[32] = {
     0,  9,  1, 10, 13, 21,  2, 29,
    11, 14, 16, 18, 22, 25,  3, 30,
     8, 12, 20, 28, 15, 17, 24,  7,
    19, 27, 23,  6, 26,  5,  4, 31};

int log2_32 (uint32_t value)
{
    value |= value >> 1;
    value |= value >> 2;
    value |= value >> 4;
    value |= value >> 8;
    value |= value >> 16;
    return tab32[(uint32_t)(value*0x07C4ACDD) >> 27];
}

As with any other computational method, log2 requires the input value to be greater than zero.

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice! Thanks for bothering to get back on this. –  ArjunShankar Jul 9 '12 at 16:03
    
@ArjunShankar You're welcome. However, I still think there is a way of shaving off those two ops in the table lookup line, namely subtraction and right shift, by means of generating another perfect hashing function. Don't know if I'll have enough time for this pursuing of zen as long as my main compilers are MSVC and GCC ;) –  Desmond Hume Jul 9 '12 at 16:29
    
@ArjunShankar And, for the clarity of where the operations, table entries, and constants come from, I've updated the answer to cite the sources. –  Desmond Hume Jul 9 '12 at 16:50
1  
To help with the trade off between portability and speed, on an Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5650 @ 2.67GHz the lookup table is on average about 4 times slower than the intrinsic (about 13 cycles vs 4 cycles) –  ComeRaczy Aug 15 '13 at 13:23
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If you are using GCC, a lookup table is unnecessary in this case.

GCC provides a builtin function to determine the amount of leading zeros:

Built-in Function: int __builtin_clz (unsigned int x)
Returns the number of leading 0-bits in x, starting at the most significant bit position. If x is 0, the result is undefined.

So you can define:

#define LOG2(X) ((unsigned) (8*sizeof (unsigned long long) - __builtin_clzll((X)) - 1))

and it will work for any unsigned long long int. The result is rounded down.

For x86 and AMD64 GCC will compile it to a bsr instruction, so the solution is very fast (much faster than lookup tables).

Working example:

#include <stdio.h>

#define LOG2(X) ((unsigned) (8*sizeof (unsigned long long) - __builtin_clzll((X)) - 1))

int main(void) {
    unsigned long long input;
    while (scanf("%llu", &input) == 1) {
        printf("log(%llu) = %u\n", input, LOG2(input));
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
How about also handling "If x is 0, the result is undefined." in your example? :) –  ArjunShankar Jul 7 '12 at 16:41
    
@ArjunShankar actually I thought about it, but couldn't think of an appropriate integer for that case. ;) I leave it to the interested reader to add an if-else case to the macro. (Also only the result will be undefined [most likely 0], but there won't be a crash if a 0 was supplied.) –  Kay Jul 7 '12 at 16:46
    
Fair enough. +1 –  ArjunShankar Jul 7 '12 at 16:47
    
@kay Didn't know about bsr instruction. Wanted it to be more CPU-independent tho. Thanks. –  Desmond Hume Jul 7 '12 at 17:27
1  
#define LOG2(X) ((unsigned) (8*sizeof (unsigned long long) - __builtin_clzll ((X)) needs a - 1 in there. LOG2(1ULL << 63) ought to be 63. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 7 '12 at 19:30
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Here's a pretty compact and fast extension, using no additional temporaries:

r = 0;

/* If its wider than 32 bits, then we already know that log >= 32.
So store it in R.  */
if (v >> 32)
  {
    r = 32;
    v >>= 32;
  }

/* Now do the exact same thing as the 32 bit algorithm,
except we ADD to R this time.  */
if (tt = v >> 16)
  {
    r += (t = tt >> 8) ? 24 + LogTable256[t] : 16 + LogTable256[tt];
  }
else
  {
    r += (t = v >> 8) ? 8 + LogTable256[t] : LogTable256[v];
  }

Here is one built with a chain of ifs, again using no additional temporaries. Might not be the fastest though.

  if (tt = v >> 48)
    {
      r = (t = tt >> 8) ? 56 + LogTable256[t] : 48 + LogTable256[tt];
    }
  else if (tt = v >> 32)
    {
      r = (t = tt >> 8) ? 40 + LogTable256[t] : 32 + LogTable256[tt];
    }
  else if (tt = v >> 16)
    {
      r = (t = tt >> 8) ? 24 + LogTable256[t] : 16 + LogTable256[tt];
    }
  else 
    {
      r = (t = v >> 8) ? 8 + LogTable256[t] : LogTable256[v];
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
(unsigned long long or uint64_t) –  dbaupp Jul 7 '12 at 15:58
1  
@dbaupp - I was just too lazy to write a main and include stdint.h. Thanks for the nudge. I tried it in the meanwhile, and it's working fine. –  ArjunShankar Jul 7 '12 at 16:02
    
@ArjunShankar The first algorithm is hands down awesome. Thank you. –  Desmond Hume Jul 7 '12 at 16:53
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The algorithm basically finds out which byte contains the most significant 1 bit, and then looks up that byte in the lookup to find the log of the byte, then adds it to the position of the byte.

Here is a somewhat simplified version of the 32-bit algorithm:

if (tt = v >> 16)
{
    if (t = tt >> 8)
    {
        r = 24 + LogTable256[t];
    }
    else
    {
        r = 16 + LogTable256[tt];
    }
}
else 
{
    if (t = v >> 8)
    {
        r = 8 + LogTable256[t];
    }
    else
    {
        r = LogTable256[v];
    }
}

This is the equivalent 64-bit algorithm:

if (ttt = v >> 32)
{
    if (tt = ttt >> 16)
    {
        if (t = tt >> 8)
        {
            r = 56 + LogTable256[t];
        }
        else
        {
            r = 48 + LogTable256[tt];
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        if (t = ttt >> 8)
        {
            r = 40 + LogTable256[t];
        }
        else
        {
            r = 32 + LogTable256[ttt];
        }
    }
}
else
{
    if (tt = v >> 16)
    {
        if (t = tt >> 8)
        {
            r = 24 + LogTable256[t];
        }
        else
        {
            r = 16 + LogTable256[tt];
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        if (t = v >> 8)
        {
            r = 8 + LogTable256[t];
        }
        else
        {
            r = LogTable256[v];
        }
    }
}

I came up with an algorithm for any size types that I think is nicer than the original.

unsigned int v = 42;
unsigned int r = 0;
unsigned int b;
for (b = sizeof(v) << 2; b; b = b >> 1)
{
    if (v >> b)
    {
        v = v >> b;
        r += b;
    }
}

Note: b = sizeof(v) << 2 sets b to half the number of bits in v. I used shifting instead of multiplication here (just because I felt like it).

You could add a lookup table to that algorithm to speed it up possibly, but it's more a proof-of-concept.

share|improve this answer
    
Just personally, I think the more compact ternary version is "simpler": takes up less space. :) –  dbaupp Jul 7 '12 at 15:45
    
@dbaupp: Depends on your point of view. I expanded the ternary so it was easier to see what was going on. –  Kendall Frey Jul 7 '12 at 15:48
    
@KendallFrey Thank you, but would the fourth table look-up, if count from the beginning of the 64-bit algorithm, be able to overrun the boundaries of the table? –  Desmond Hume Jul 7 '12 at 15:53
    
@DesmondHume: Yes, I believe so. Copy-n-paste error here. Fixed. –  Kendall Frey Jul 7 '12 at 15:56
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I was trying to convert Find the log base 2 of an N-bit integer in O(lg(N)) operations with multiply and lookup to 64-bit by brute forcing the magic number. Needless to say it was taking a while.

I then found Desmond's answer and decided to try his magic number as a start point. Since I have a 6 core processor I ran it in parallel starting at 0x07EDD5E59A4E28C2 / 6 multiples. I was surprised it found something immediately. Turns out 0x07EDD5E59A4E28C2 / 2 worked.

So here is the code for 0x07EDD5E59A4E28C2 which saves you a shift and subtract:

int LogBase2(uint64_t n)
{
    static const int table[64] = {
        0, 58, 1, 59, 47, 53, 2, 60, 39, 48, 27, 54, 33, 42, 3, 61,
        51, 37, 40, 49, 18, 28, 20, 55, 30, 34, 11, 43, 14, 22, 4, 62,
        57, 46, 52, 38, 26, 32, 41, 50, 36, 17, 19, 29, 10, 13, 21, 56,
        45, 25, 31, 35, 16, 9, 12, 44, 24, 15, 8, 23, 7, 6, 5, 63 };

    n |= n >> 1;
    n |= n >> 2;
    n |= n >> 4;
    n |= n >> 8;
    n |= n >> 16;
    n |= n >> 32;

    return table[(n * 0x03f6eaf2cd271461) >> 58];
}
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