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As i understand the code below, in the synchronized block, this is an instance of a counter.

Question 1: In the example below, does this mean that when Thread A reaches the synchronized block, Thread B is blocked from doing anything to the instance of a Counter?. In other words, does this mean that Threads may continue to execute as they see please, but upon either reaches the synchronized block, the other one is stopped from doing anything to the class until the block exited?

public class Counter {

    public void increment() {
        // Some code

        synchronized (this) {  // <---- "this" is an instance of Counter
             // Some more code
        }
    }
}

Compare code above with

public class Counter {

    List<String> listOfStrings = new ArrayList<String>();

    public void increment() {
        // Some code

        synchronized (listOfStrings) {  
             // Some code that deals with 
             //    listOfStrings 
        }
    }
}

Question 2: In the example above, once Thread A reaches the synchronized block, Thread B may continue reading and writing anything in the class with the exception of listOfStrings ArrayList, which is a mutex in the synchronized block. Is this correct?

Question 3: Is it further correct to assume that if we need to make modifications to multiple objects, this is the mutex we should use?

For example:

public class Counter {

    List<String> listOfStrings = new ArrayList<String>();
    List<Integers> listOfIntegers = new ArrayList<Integers>();

    public void increment() {
        // Some code

        synchronized (this) {  
             // Some code that deals with 
             //    listOfStrings and listOfIntegers
        }
    }
}

Am i understanding things correctly? Please correct if i misstated anything.

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Primarily correct, every synchronized (object) { ... } can be thought of as blocking if another thread already entered a synchronized block of the same object. –  Joop Eggen Jul 7 '12 at 16:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Thread B is blocked from doing anything to the instance of a Counter?

No, Thread B is blocked from entering the synchronized blocks of code, it can still enter other methods: those that are not synchronized and those synchronized using different objects. Thread B cannot only access blocks synchronized using an object already taken by a different thread (synchronized locks are re-entrant).

Thread B may continue reading and writing anything in the class with the exception of listOfStrings

Not really, that fact that listOfStrings is used as a mutex in one synchronized block does not mean other threads cannot access that object explicitly. It only means that other thread cannot access synchronized blocks guarded by the same object. So if you want to secure access to listOfStrings object, all methods accessing that object must be synchronized and use the same lock (e.g. listOfStrings).

BTW every object you synchronize on should be final to avoid headaches.

Is it further correct to assume that if we need to make modifications to multiple objects, this is the mutex we should use?

Yes and no. Consider the following case:

List<String> listOfStrings = new ArrayList<String>();
List<Integers> listOfIntegers = new ArrayList<Integers>();
Set<String> setOfStrings = new HashSet<String>();
Set<Integers> setOfIntegers = new HashSet<Integers>();

If one method only accesses lists and the second method only accesses sets, you can safely use two locks - one for the first method and second one for the second method. Synchronizing on this won't hurt, but it will impact performance:

private final Object listLock = new Object();
private final Object setLock = new Object();

and later:

synchronized (listLock) {  
     // Some code that deals with 
     // setOfStrings and setOfIntegers
}

//...

synchronized (setLock) {  
     // Some code that deals with 
     // setOfStrings and setOfIntegers
}
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Tomasz - thank you. Can you clarify this: When you want to protect an object within an object from concurrent modification (such as ArrayList), should you synchronized(this) or synchronized instanceOfArrayList)? –  Jam Jul 7 '12 at 16:36
    
@JAM: use the smallest possible scope of lock, so go for synchronized(instanceOfArrayList). But synchronizing on this is safer if you access multiple fields. Also consider thread-safe collections. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 7 '12 at 16:39
    
Ok. So as a rule of thumb, if i want to guarantee that only 1 thread may make modifications to several objects, i synchronized (this), else, if i know exactly what object needs to be protected from concurrent modification, i synchronized (instanceOfAnObject). Is this correct? –  Jam Jul 7 '12 at 16:41
    
@JAM: yes, but also see my example with listLock and setLock. BTW think in terms of: can multiple threads access this code? as opposed to what am I synchronizing on? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 7 '12 at 16:43

Quick answers:

  1. The lock from synchronized is re-entrant, meaning that the Thread that acquired it can still enter any other synchronized block on the same object. Any other thread that wants to enter any synchronized block on that object will be blocked.

  2. Synchronization on an object does not mean that the object cannot be modified. REMARK: do not think of a synchronized object as anything else than a mutex. Any Thread can enter a method of the class that does not synchronize on the object. If that method modifies the object, nothing can prevent it. To obtain what you want, you need to make the class of the synchronized object itself thread-safe.

  3. You are not correct: you are correct, but you are overdoing it. You should not jump to using the largest scope that synchronizes the class that you want. In fact, you should not rely on this in general. It is rather preferable to lock on internal objects (even "dummy ones" such as a new Object()) to the class, otherwise any code that uses objects from that class would be allowed to try to synchronize on them.

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On #2, i misspoke. I means that only the Thread that hit the synchronized block first may modify the variable. All other threads are blocked from touching it –  Jam Jul 7 '12 at 16:40
    
@JAM I added a remark to clarify the issue. –  Luca Geretti Jul 7 '12 at 16:47

The object in synchronized block is just a token, meaning that the thread that holds the token can enter the execution block (whats inside synchronized), Its not locking the access to that object.

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In java any object can be used as mutex - java.lang.Object has capability to act as mutex and has wait() and notify() methods.

Synchronized block takes reference to object - as soon as a thread enters the synchronized block, the object passed as mutex is locked. Whenever thread tries to enter the synchronized block it checks the lock on mutex object. If the object is locked, thread waits on the object. Once the working thread exits the synchronized block - notify method on object is called and the waiting threads are notified - out of all the waiting threads only one thread would lock the object and enter synchronized block, remaining threads continue waiting on the object reference.

It is very important to decide what object to use as mutex - as described in your scenarios.

Another important point to note is that synchronized block does not prevent multiple threads from editing the mutex object. This is with reference to your Question 2 - specifically following sentence:

In the example above, once Thread A reaches the synchronized block, Thread B may continue reading and writing anything in the class with the exception of listOfStrings ArrayList, which is a mutex in the synchronized block

Assumption that Thread B cannot read/write listOfStrings, since it is used as mutex, is wrong. Following scenario might allow listOfString being worked upon by mutliple threads:

public class Counter {      

List<String> listOfStrings = new ArrayList<String>();  

public void decrement(){
   listOfStrings = new ArrayList<String>();
}

public void increment() {      
    // Some code      

    synchronized (listOfStrings) {        
         // Some code that deals with       
         //    listOfStrings       
    }      
 }      
}      

In above scenario Thread A might call increment - enter synchronized block locking listOfStrings, simultaneously Thread B might call decrement, it would be able to update listOfStrings even though it is used a mutex in increment. This is so because synchronized block does not prevent updation of mutex object - it just ensures 2 threads doesnot enter synchronized block with same mutex object. The name mutex highlights this essence - mutual exclusion - it is not complusion but mutual understanding by different code blocks to use same mutex.

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Ok, but assuming that no new instance of listOfStrings is created, the original one can't be modified by Thread B when Thread A is inside the synchronized block, right? –  Jam Jul 7 '12 at 17:17
    
Thread B would still be able to modify listOfStrings outside synchronized block. synchronized blocks do not make objects readonly, it just sets a flag marking object as in use by some thread. Any other thread can still modify object outside the synchronized block –  Rutesh Makhijani Jul 8 '12 at 16:45

Regarding question 1: multiple threads can execute the code outside the synchronized block simultaneously, but one one thread at a time can execute the code within the synchronized block. In general, you would want to put any code that modifies instance variables of the Counter class inside the block, while code that only works with local variables of the current method could go outside of the synchronized block.

Regarding questions two and three: you can synchronize on whatever object you'd like, as long as all the code that accesses instance variables of Counter goes inside the synchronized block (assuming that you don't want anything to read data from counter while a write operation is in-flight). I'd actually suggest synchronizing on one of the Lists, or even an explicit private standalone Object instance in this case though- if there's no need for code outside this class to directly acquire its synchronization monitor, it's generally best to disable that by synchronizing on a private object internal to the class.

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