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I am trying to upgrade one of my Rails projects to Ruby 1.9.2. All went pretty well, but one RSpec test broke. In this test I require a Ruby lib:

# file spec/models/my_lib_spec.rb
require 'spec_helper'
require 'lib/services/my_lib'

describe "MyLib" do

  it "should do something" do
...

The lib looks like this:

# file lib/services/my_lib.rb
class MyLib

  def self.do_something
  ...

In Ruby 1.8.7 (REE) the test worked well:

$ ruby -v   
ruby 1.8.7 (2011-02-18 patchlevel 334) [i686-darwin11.1.0], MBARI 0x6770, Ruby
Enterprise Edition 2011.03
$ rspec ./spec/models/my_lib_spec.rb
..

Finished in 1.4 seconds
2 examples, 0 failures

In Ruby 1.9.2 I get an Error no such file to load:

$ ruby -v
ruby 1.9.2p290 (2011-07-09 revision 32553) [x86_64-darwin11.1.0]
$ rspec ./spec/models/my_lib_spec.rb
/Users/tmangner/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.2-p290@madgoal/gems/activesupport-
3.2.2/lib/active_support/dependencies.rb:251:in `require': no such file
to load -- lib/services/my_lib (LoadError)

I have no clue, what keeps Ruby 1.9 from finding the lib.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The load path in ruby 1.9 doesn't work exactly like it did in 1.8.

You need to add the project's root directory to your load path.

You can do this by either running rspec like this:

rspec -I . ./spec/models/tipp_remember_spec.rb

...or by manually adding stuff to the load path in your spec_helper.rb (put this at the top of your spec_helper.rb

$:<< File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), '..')

I think rspec by default adds your local lib directory to the load path as well, so you might be able to rewrite the require line as follows instead:

require 'services/my_lib'
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1  
The last part of your answer was the key! "require 'service/my_lib'" works in Ruby1.9 and Ruby1.8. Obviously RSpec does include 'lib' into the $LOAD_PATH. –  DiegoFrings Jul 7 '12 at 18:12
1  
great! rspec - I . is the key for me when upgrading ruby from 1.8 to 1.9. thanks a lot @Frost! –  Siwei Shen Dec 7 '12 at 2:43
    
If you don't want to specify -I . each time you run rspec you can add it to your .rspec file and it will be added by default. –  bloudermilk May 20 at 23:17

In RSpec 2.x, the lib directory is automatically added to the load path (see RSpec-Core#get_started).

So you can just use require 'services/my_lib' in your spec file.

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I can not see the lib directory is automatically added to the load path anywhere , but it is true –  why Apr 9 '13 at 6:25
    
@why I fixed the broken link. Looks like it's not explicitly stated in there, but the example does show it implicitly used. I'll try to get that fixed. –  Aaron K Apr 10 '13 at 1:49

If your spec is located spec/models/my_lib_spec.rb and you want to test lib/services/my_lib.rb, then just tell the spec how to get to the lib file

require 'spec_helper'
require_relative '../../lib/services/my_lib'

describe "MyLib" do

  it "should do something" do

Final note: since you're including spec_helper, you typically don't have to give all paths to dependencies, since Rails should load all of these for you.

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Try defining the path manually

$LOAD_PATH << './lib/services/'

and then add the library like this

require 'my_lib.rb'
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