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I am currently working on my first app for the iPhone, I am almost done and but I am having a problem with memory management and such. Keep in mind I am pretty good with java and I only have been learning Objective C for about 4 days.

So, the exact problem lies in this area (Between the lines of asterisks'). Note: All of the code lies inside a big game loop if that matters.

else 
        {
            ***********************************
            NSString *rand = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", randNumberS];
            while(lastTime + interval >= currentTime)
            {
        !!!!!!!!!NSString *user = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", userText]; 
                    if([user isEqualToString: rand])
                    {
            ***********************************
                        score += 10;
                        randNumberS = nil;
                        timeToGenerateNum = true;
                        bottomClear = true;
                        break;
                    }
                    else 
                    {

                        //NSLog(@"%@ != %@, %i", userText, randNumberS, score);
                    }

            }
            NSLog(@"Game Over! Your score was %i!", score);
        }
    }

Every time I ran before I enabled zombies (Note: The code ran for a few seconds btw), I got a Thread 6: Program received signal: "EXC_BAD_ACCESS" at the line marked with the "!". After I enabled zombies, it runs for a few seconds and then it stops working and the message -[CFString respondsToSelector:]: message sent to deallocated instance 0x11168440 appears in the console. It also flags the same line with the "!"

I looked both of these up and they both point to poor memory management, I have tried releasing the NSString objects but my program won't let me release the objects (Note: I get this error message "release" is unavailable: not available in automatic reference counting mode).

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks!

EDIT:

userText is used in a various number of methods, but mostly in this one.

-(IBAction)button1Clicked:(id)sender
{    
if(userText == nil)
{
    userText = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%i", 1];
}
else 
{
    userText = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%i",userText , 1];
}
bottomLabel.text = userText;
NSLog(@"Test 1");
}
share|improve this question
    
It looks like the instance at userText is no longer around, can you show where that gets initialize, and how it's handled elsewhere in this code? –  ctrahey Jul 7 '12 at 16:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The userText variable is not a valid object, which is what your error messages indicate. In general, EXC_BAD_ACCESS happens when you try to use a pointer which points to something that is no longer around. Then with Zombies enabled, the message is even more clear, userText used to be a string, but has been deallocated.

EDIT:

If userText is an instance variable, it is recommended to use properties and then the dot notation. Somewhere there is an @interface section where userText is declared. It should look like this:

@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *userText;

Then in an @implementaiton area, something like this:

@synthesize userText = _userText;

These, together, make dot-notation available, and then you should use self.userText to access it everywhere (except custom accessors):

self.userText = @"something";
NSString *something = self.userText;
share|improve this answer
    
How do I reallocate it then? –  HDAViiRuS Jul 7 '12 at 16:47
    
You don't reallocate them, you keep them around with 'strong' (owning) references. –  NicolasMiari Jul 7 '12 at 16:51
    
@ranReloaded Can you specify how I would do that, and thanks! –  HDAViiRuS Jul 7 '12 at 16:54
    
Edited my comment to show the recommended way to do this. –  ctrahey Jul 7 '12 at 16:58
1  
Technically - NSString properties should be copy not strong unless you want the possibility of the variable being changed out from under you. –  Abizern Jul 7 '12 at 17:05

You are using ARC, and as such you will not be able to release objects, however if you want to release them you can set them to nil.

Instead you can use weak for vars that you don't need to keep, or strong modifier for those you intend to keep.

If you are just learning obj-c i would highly recommend disabling ARC so you can get a full understanding of how objective-c works and why ARC is now the recommendation from apple.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But do you know the solution to my problem? –  HDAViiRuS Jul 7 '12 at 16:50
1  
I do make usertext a property in your header with the strong qualifier and your problem will be solved. –  Oscar Gomez Jul 7 '12 at 16:54

Run your app on the simulator under Instruments (using Xcode's Product > Profile menu item). Choose the Zombies instrument. When Instruments stops your app because of a zombie reference, you can drill down in the details panel (bottom part of the Instruments window) to find a history of retains and releases on the zombie object. You can see a stack trace for each retain and release by opening the extended details panel (right side of the Instruments window).

This should help you track down why your zombie object is getting released before you expect.

Links with additional guidance:

http://www.markj.net/iphone-memory-debug-nszombie/

http://www.dimzzy.com/blog/2011/02/hunting-down-zombies-in-ios-apps/

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A common way of solving these sorts of problems is to enable NSZombies. This will flag up when you are sending messages to deallocated objects in friendlier way than throwing this exception.

Also With ARC you can't use retain, release or autorelease because those calls are added by the compiler when building.

There are some odd constructions with the way you are creating the rand and user NSStrings, but without knowing what randNumberS and userText are I can't help much more.

Finally, since you are new with Cocoa and Objective-C; there is the Coding Style Guide by Apple, and I wrote a coding conventions guide.

There are conventions when writing Cocoa that make it easier for other developers to read your code.

share|improve this answer
    
@Abizem Thanks, I will look into both! –  HDAViiRuS Jul 7 '12 at 17:09

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